Archive for the ‘2003 Fall’ Category

Unprecedented Number of Undergraduates Selected To Present Papers at National Conference

Monday, December 15th, 2003

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 15, 2003

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260

Unprecedented Number of Undergraduates Selected To Present Papers at National Conference

Twenty-four business students at California State University, Chico will travel to Atlantic City, New Jersey, at the end of March to present 12 papers at the 4th Annual Conference of the International Academy of E-Business.

The students worked in teams to research the 12 papers on e-commerce that they will present. A selection committee of professors blind-reviewed the papers. Nitish Singh, Department of Finance and Marketing, teaches the three sections of e-marketing in which the students researched and wrote the papers.

“Each student paper investigated a unique area and collected data, which, I believe, increased the chances of their acceptance,” said Singh.

Although many professors at CSU, Chico encourage their best students to submit research papers to professional conferences, it is rare for all papers submitted to be accepted and for such a large number of undergraduates from one university to be invited to present at a professional conference.

The student research included such topics as an investigation of the cultural factors that international marketers and Web designers must consider when designing their international Web sites, by Amber Melissa Poe and Claudia Madrigal; and research into the relationship between the interactivity of consumer Web sites and the purchasing intention of consumers who visit the sites, by Adam J. Miller, Justin Nassie, Jonathon Mizrahi and Keith Fickert.

The conference co-chair, Connie Nichols Kothari, wrote in a letter of acceptance to Singh that the program committee was impressed with the quality of the student proposals. “We are sure your students’ research efforts, even on an exploratory basis, will provide useful insights on e-business,” said Kothari.

The students will receive a discount on the registration fee of the conference and the opportunity for their papers to be considered for publication in the E-R.

Business Review, Volume lV, the proceedings of the conference. The papers will also be submitted to other scholarly publications.

Students have agreed to pay for their own trips to Atlantic City. Singh submitted and received a grant from the Academy for International Business for $4,000 to cover registration fees for the students. He is looking for sponsors to help students with some of the other costs.

“Presenting at an international academic conference will give these students great exposure and encourage them to pursue research projects in the future. It is a great accomplishment to put on their résumés,” said Singh.

Singh is an associate professor of marketing in the Department of Finance and Marketing. He joined the CSU, Chico faculty in August 2003. He received his Ph.D. from Saint Louis University in July 2003 in marketing and international business.

For more information, contact Singh at 530-898-6090.

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The Orion Wins Seventh National Pacemaker Award

Thursday, December 11th, 2003

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 11, 2003

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

The Orion Wins Seventh National Pacemaker Award

California State University, Chico’s student newspaper The Orion has won its seventh National Pacemaker award–widely considered the top prize for general excellence in college journalism.

The award was presented Nov. 8 by Executive Director Tom Rolnicki, Associated Collegiate Press, at the 82nd annual National College Media Convention. Held at the Hyatt in Dallas, the convention attracted about 2,600 college journalists from throughout the United States and Canada.

In announcing this year’s winners, Rolnicki noted that the National Pacemaker is often referred to as “the Pulitzer Prize of college journalism.”

The Orion was the only university newspaper in California to receive a National Pacemaker this year, although three others were finalists for the award-The Daily Californian at UC Berkeley, the Daily Bruin at UCLA and The Graphic at Pepperdine.

The staff of the Dallas Morning-News did the judging for the Pacemaker.

The Orion’s managing editor, Melody Gutierrez of Twentynine Palms, and the art director, Jessie Gardner of Reno, accepted the award on behalf of The Orion staff. Rob Calvin, business manager, David Waddell, faculty advisor and several memebers of the staff also attended the convention.

“I was so nervous sitting there and hoping our name would be called,” Gutierrez said. “We gripped each others’ hands like a football team waiting for the final field goal kick. When we heard The Orion’s named called, we jumped up and screamed. This award shows that all of our long hours and hard work really paid off.”

“Quite a loud roar went up from our section of the convention hall when The Orion’s name was called-a display of The Orion spirit,” said Dave Waddell, faculty advisor.

“Winning a Pacemaker means you’re the best of the best. It speaks to the passion and commitment of our editorial, design and advertising staffs.”

The four award-winning issues came from the fall 2002 and spring 2003 semesters. In fall 2002, Jennifer Cooper of Joshua Tree was managing editor, Brent Hainsworth of Lompoc was art director and Tyler Lewis of Santa Rosa was business manager. Gardner became art director in spring 2003, joining the returning Cooper and Lewis. Gutierrez was news editor in fall 2002 and opinion editor in spring 2003.

The Orion, a habitual finalist for the National Pacemaker since the late 1980s, won the award five times in the 1990s.

In addition to the Pacemaker awards, The Orion has captured a slew of state, regional and national awards. The National Newspaper Association and the Society of Professional Journalists have each named The Orion the nation’s best university weekly in recent years.

The CSU, Chico paper also was picked as the Associated College Press’ Newspaper of the Year at the National College Newspaper Convention five times in the last six years. And the California Newspaper Publishers Association has named The Orion the state’s best university newspaper in seven of the last nine years.

The Orion, which was founded in 1975, is a laboratory newspaper of CSU, Chico’s nationally accredited department of journalism.

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CSU, Chico Welcomes Own Peace Corps Representative

Thursday, December 11th, 2003

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 11, 2003

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260

CSU, Chico Welcomes Own Peace Corps Representative

California State University, Chico has a resident Peace Corps representative for the first time in several decades. Justin Spence has been hired, with the help of a grant submitted by the Office of International Programs to the Peace Corps, to spread the word about the Peace Corps on campus.

Spence is very familiar with the Peace Corps. His parents served in Malawi and Ghana during the 1960s, and Spence and his wife, Catalin Kaser, served in Eritrea, on the Horn of Africa, and then in the Solomon Islands for two years from 1997 to1998.

Spence and Kaser taught English in Eritrea until the war with Ethiopia forced them to leave in 1998. He learned a tremendous amount through the experience about the people and about himself, he said.

“I learned to speak Tigrinya and the basics of being a teacher. I learned that ethnic and religious diversity doesn’t have to lead to strife. I learned to appreciate some things about the United States that I had taken for granted, such as running water and the education system. I learned that I could eat a goat kneecap!” he said.

Spence graduated from the University of California, Davis with bachelor’s degrees in French and linguistics. After the service, the couple lived in Ithaca, N.Y., where Spence obtained a master’s degree in linguistics at Cornell University. They moved to California in August 2002 to be closer to family.

“Chico State, with its ethic of volunteerism, produces a lot of potential volunteers,” said Susan Place, associate dean for graduate and international programs.

“The program is an international experience combined with altruistic work and tangible benefits. It’s a fabulous opportunity for students,” said Spence.

There are 25 alums from Chico serving abroad at this time. A total of 504 alumni from CSU, Chico have served in the Peace Corps since 1961, said Dennis McMahan, public affairs specialist in San Francisco.

Spence is currently working part time in the new campus representative position. He speaks to classes and conducts informational meetings weekly. For more information about the Peace Corps, contact Spence at 530-898-4829.

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Journalist, Screenwriter to Speak on Northern Ireland Politics of Peace, Nov. 12

Thursday, November 27th, 2003

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 27, 2003

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260

Journalist, Screenwriter to Speak on Northern Ireland Politics of Peace, Nov. 12

California State University, Chico graduate Kelly Candaele’s claim to fame is that he co-wrote the screenplay for “A League of Their Own,” based on his mother’s professional baseball career in the 1940s.

His passion, though, is Northern Ireland, and the spiritual politics of peace, a concept he says has to do with the ability to go beyond the impulses toward revenge and retaliation, and to recognize the suffering of others.

Candaele, who received his M.A. in psychology and counseling from CSU, Chico in 1980, will be the featured speaker for this year’s Hodgkins Peace Studies Lecture. His talk, Northern Ireland: The Spiritual Politics of Peace, takes place Wednesday, Nov. 12 at 7:30 p.m. in Harlen Adams Theatre and is free and open to the public.

Candaele is also an accomplished journalist, published in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Nation and Irish America. It was as a journalist that he accompanied President Clinton on several trips to Northern Ireland. On these trips, Candaele said he helped facilitate the peace process in his own way by meeting with many groups who were interested in fostering better communication between Americans and people from both sides of the Northern Ireland conflict.

He has traveled to Northern Ireland at least 20 times since the IRA cease-fire in 1994, including three times with President Clinton’s entourage and when President George W. Bush met Prime Minister Tony Blair in Belfast.

“I’ve learned a good deal about the hold communal identity has on people in areas of intense conflict-but also about the ability of leaders and others to attempt to reconcile differences that are seemingly intractable,” said Candaele.

Candaele’s lecture should be of interest virtually to all members of the campus and community, noted Ron Hirschbein, Department of Philosophy, who is coordinating the Hodgkins Peace Studies Lecture.

“Kelly is one of our most accomplished graduates-a prominent screenwriter and highly regarded reporter with first-hand knowledge of world events,” said Hirschbein.

Candaele said he has fond memories of the time he spent in Chico. Hirschbein
remembers him as being interested in progressive politics and other humane causes.

“I was an academic j-walker at Chico as I took classes in philosophy, history, literature, political science, sociology, religious studies,” said Candaele. “So it really was a classic liberal arts education.”

He said his fondest memories of Chico were of the relationships he formed with his professors. “I remember most the professors who took me under their wings, so to speak, who were friends as well as educators. It was that kind of place.”

In addition to “A League of their Own,” Candaele has been involved in several other movies, including an award-winning film on the life of assassinated Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme and a film on the Chinese human rights activist Harry Wu.

Candaele’s visit to CSU, Chico is made possible by an endowment from the Hodgkins family and from the support of the Office of International Programs, the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, the College of Humanities and Fine Arts, the Department of Philosophy, and VIVA (Volunteers Inspiring Vocational Action).

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Friday, November 14th, 2003

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 14, 2003

Joe Wills or Amy Flynn
530-898-4143

Students, Staff and Community Make Fright Fest a Success

CHICO, Calif.- Associated Students’ Fright Fest 2003 was a successful Halloween event supported by students and staff at California State University, Chico, as well as community members and local businesses.

“Associated Students would like to thank all those who attended Fright Fest and the Midnight Breakfast,” said Michael Dailey, AS President. There were 450 students at Fright Fest and breakfast fed between 450 and 500 people, Dailey said.

The Last Band Standing–where local bands competed for cash–was a popular feature this year. Inflatable Supermodels won the $500 prize and Chingus took second place.

“The concert seemed to match the students’ desires,” Dailey said. “Next year we want to attract big name bands and expand the concert as a new Halloween tradition.”

A special thanks goes to the Audio Engineering Society on campus, which brought forward its vision for a battle of the bands event on Halloween. The group helped AS coordinate band auditions and technical assistance at the concert.

Fright Fest 2003 was made possible by the efforts of AS career staff and student employees, AS Conference Services and Facilities Management, The Edge and other volunteers.

Fright Fest 2003 was sponsored by Associated Students, the City of Chico, Audio Engineering Society and the university’s Office of the President. Awards for the costume contest were donated by local businesses, including Sacred Art Tattooing, Sun-Sational Tanning and Green Dragon Body Piercing.

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Elementary Students to Have a Field Day with Math on Nov. 14

Wednesday, November 12th, 2003

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 12, 2003

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260

Elementary Students to Have a Field Day with Math on Nov. 14

Approximately 160 fourth, fifth and sixth graders from Jay Partridge Elementary School will spend the day at California State University, Chico on Friday, Nov. 14, participating in the Mathematics Field Day.

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics plans to have such an event each fall and spring semester.

Liberal studies students enrolled in beginning and advanced math for teachers will engage their elementary partners in mathematical activities designed to be enjoyable and to inspire interest in math. Rapti di Silva and Katy Early are organizing the event.

The day begins at 9 a.m. in the Bell Memorial Union with students doing mental math and exploring fraction concepts with pattern blocks and tangrams with their partners from MATH 50A and 50B. In the second session, participants will investigate concepts in probability and geometry with their MATH 50B partners.

During lunch, the young mathematicians will be treated to “Mathletics” by the Math Club.” Mathletics” is Early’s term for getting students moving with activities that have a math slant, such as estimating jumps, then predicting combinations of jumps to reach a goal.

The fifth and sixth graders will participate in a third session with students in MATH 112 and 113 on concepts of algebra and geometry.

“The Mathematics Field Day builds a bridge between the current learning and future career of pre-service teachers. They will learn about children’s mathematics backgrounds and their ways of learning; children will be introduced to new math concepts. The day also enhances the connection between Chico State teaching and local K-12 education,” said Duke Sun, MATH 50B and MATH 112 instructor.

In addition to di Silva and Early, the following CSU, Chico math teachers helped prepare the liberal studies students for the field day: Duke Sun, Maureen Dion, Sanjay Dev, Bill Fisher, Tamsen Herrick, Robin Soloway, Bob Stofa and John Van Veen. The Mangrove Safeway will donate snacks for the day.

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Staff Council to Collect Donations for Needy Children

Tuesday, November 11th, 2003

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 11, 2003

Amy Flynn or Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Staff Council to Collect Donations for Needy Children

The Staff Council at California State University, Chico will collect donations for the University’s Needy Children’s Program, beginning Friday, Nov. 14, through Wednesday, Dec. 10, in the Sierra Hall Annex building.

The annual program donates clothing, supplies and toys to needy families in the area during the holiday season. Staff Council coordinates the adoption of families by departments and campus organizations; however, individual donations are welcome.

Nearly $40,000 is raised in money and gifts each year, said Yvonne Lydon, program coordinator for Staff Council. Suggested gifts include, toys, school supplies, clothing, jewelry, hygiene products, household items and gift certificates. Monetary donations will go towards food certificates.

“Our campus is extremely generous,” said Lydon. “The social workers love our program and save for us their neediest families who are making positive progress in becoming happy, healthy families.”

The sponsored families are given to Staff Council by the Children’s Division of the Butte County Division of Social Services, based on a true need. Each family’s social worker serves as the primary contact for sponsoring departments or campus groups. The social worker provides a list of primary needs and a few wish-list items for each family.

The University’s Needy Children’s Program has been a campus-wide project since 1990. The program has grown from adopting 19 families at its inception to serving 80 families each year, said Lydon.

For more information, contact Lydon at 898-4222, or the Staff Council office at 898-6156.

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Outdoor Education Class to Teach Wilderness Survival Skills

Wednesday, November 5th, 2003

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 5, 2003

Amy Flynn or Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Outdoor Education Class to Teach Wilderness Survival Skills

California State University, Chico’s Bidwell Environmental Institute Field Studies Program will host an outdoor orienteering and wilderness survival skills class on Saturday, Nov. 15, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve.

Individuals or families, hikers, backpackers, and anyone over 12 years old can participate. All levels of experience are welcome, even those with experience will learn from the informative instruction.

This is the first class in a series of outdoor education classes for the community at the ecological reserve. The class can hold 15 people. The course fee is $30 non-refundable.

Checks should be made out to the CSU Research Foundation and must be received by Tuesday, Nov. 11. Mail checks to the CSU Research Foundation, CSU, Chico, 400 West First Street, Chico, CA 95929-0555, attention to Jeff Mott, reserve manager. Please include name, address and telephone number of each participant.

Dave Mahan, the class instructor, is a graduate student in physical education, with an emphasis in outdoor education, at CSU, Chico. He’s been an Adventure Outings trip leader for the past two years and he taught outdoor orienteering to the staff.

Mahan previously worked in the outdoor recreational leadership program at Central Oregon Community College. He was also enlisted in the United States Marine Corps for four years and taught survival skills for his platoon.

For more information, contact Mott at 898-6317.

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Ukrainian Educators Intern in Citizen Education Program

Monday, November 3rd, 2003

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 3, 2003

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260

Ukrainian Educators Intern in Citizen Education Program

California State University, Chico, in collaboration with the Red Bluff Joint Union High School District and the Chico Unified School District, is providing a five-week internship program to explore and develop civics education curriculum with seven participating Ukrainian educators.

The Ukrainian teachers, who arrived on Oct. 10 and will stay until Nov. 17, are linked with mentor teachers and administrators at Red Bluff High School. The program provides internships, professional development workshops, site visits, and experience-America activities.

“Citizenship education is an essential component in the democratic transition occurring in the newly independent states (NIS),” said Diana Parks, program director. “Good citizenship requires a commitment to the fundamental values and principles of democracy. Civic education, consequently, becomes an essential vehicle for teaching young people about the rights and responsibilities of civic life.”

Although reform is changing the face of education in the NIS, Parks said that many challenges remain. There is a lack of technology, limited supplies, and lack of training in new methodologies such as problem-based learning. This training program provides these Ukrainian teachers a close look at the curriculum and methodology employed in civics education in the United States. During the program, they will develop curriculum materials and methods for use in their own classes and schools.

The program is mutually beneficial to the Ukrainians and the hosts. Red Bluff teachers will share their expertise in teaching civics with the Ukrainians and learn from them. The Ukrainian teachers will deliver presentations on conditions in their home country to educators and students from CSU, Chico, local schools, PTA, and community groups.

The United States Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs sponsors the program. As part of the program, two teachers from Red Bluff Unified District, not yet chosen will spend two weeks in the Ukraine in the spring, observing and sharing best practices in teaching.

For further information contact: Diana Parks, program director, at 898-6049, or Kim LeBlanc, program manager, at 828-9740.

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Ukrainian Educators Intern in Citizen Education Program

Monday, November 3rd, 2003

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 3, 2003

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260

Ukrainian Educators Intern in Citizen Education Program

California State University, Chico, in collaboration with the Red Bluff Joint Union High School District and the Chico Unified School District, is providing a five-week internship program to explore and develop civics education curriculum with seven participating Ukrainian educators.

The Ukrainian teachers, who arrived on Oct. 10 and will stay until Nov. 17, are linked with mentor teachers and administrators at Red Bluff High School. The program provides internships, professional development workshops, site visits, and experience-America activities.

“Citizenship education is an essential component in the democratic transition occurring in the newly independent states (NIS),” said Diana Parks, program director. “Good citizenship requires a commitment to the fundamental values and principles of democracy. Civic education, consequently, becomes an essential vehicle for teaching young people about the rights and responsibilities of civic life.”

Although reform is changing the face of education in the NIS, Parks said that many challenges remain. There is a lack of technology, limited supplies, and lack of training in new methodologies such as problem-based learning. This training program provides these Ukrainian teachers a close look at the curriculum and methodology employed in civics education in the United States. During the program, they will develop curriculum materials and methods for use in their own classes and schools.

The program is mutually beneficial to the Ukrainians and the hosts. Red Bluff teachers will share their expertise in teaching civics with the Ukrainians and learn from them. The Ukrainian teachers will deliver presentations on conditions in their home country to educators and students from CSU, Chico, local schools, PTA, and community groups.

The United States Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs sponsors the program. As part of the program, two teachers from Red Bluff Unified District, not yet chosen will spend two weeks in the Ukraine in the spring, observing and sharing best practices in teaching.

For further information contact: Diana Parks, program director, at 898-6049, or Kim LeBlanc, program manager, at 828-9740.

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