Archive for the ‘2008 Spring’ Category

Instruction in Chinese and Arabic Expanded

Tuesday, June 24th, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 24, 2008

Joe Wills
530-898-4143
Joel Zimbelman,
College of Humanities and Fine Arts,
530-898-5351

Instruction in Chinese and Arabic Expanded

Beginning with the fall 2008 semester, California State University, Chico will offer regularly scheduled courses in Chinese and Arabic taught by native speakers hired exclusively for the new program.

CSU, Chico has taught these and many other languages in a self-instructional/tutorial format for years, as well as a regular complement of courses in Japanese, German, French, Italian, Spanish, and Hebrew. However, with the growing strategic and economic importance of the Middle East and China to the United States, the University sought to expand the teaching of these languages.

Starting this fall, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures will offer first- and second-semester Arabic and similar courses in Chinese/Putongua (Mandarin), in addition to a conversational Chinese course.

“Establishing Chico programs in Chinese and Arabic has been something we wanted to do for quite awhile,” said Joel Zimbelman, interim dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts, “but we have been hampered by the cost and the difficulty of finding adequately trained and experienced teachers.”

Zimbelman said that changed this year, when the campus received commitments totaling approximately $95,000 from the Chinese government and the Fulbright Commission to fund the positions over three years. The University is also contributing funds for the new courses, he said.

The grant from the People’s Republic of China will pay the major portion of a faculty position for three years, allowing the University to assess the next step in growing the program. Fulbright grants are for one year—but renewable—and Zimbelman anticipates that funding could continue for several years.

“The goal of offering these strategic languages is to provide our students with an initial and basic introduction to the language,” said Zimbelman. He said it’s expected that many students—including those with majors in the liberal arts disciplines as well as majors such as kinesiology, business, area studies, and education—will then take advantage of the various study abroad options available to them through the CSU system, the University Study Abroad Consortium (USAC, http://usac.unr.edu/usac/default.aspx), and other international programs offered by CSU, Chico. The University’s Study Abroad Web site.

CSU, Chico has entered into two partnerships with Chinese universities, with a third in the works this year, Zimbelman said, and there are plans to develop campus partners in the Middle East in the next year or two. “It’s a bit early to say whether or not we would offer a minor or major in these languages in the near future,” said Zimbelman, “but at the very least we want to provide students with the tools they might need to pursue other degree options. It’s up to them then to decide how to take the resource and make it work for their education.”

The course schedule for fall 2008 for all language classes is available at http://cypress.csuchico.edu/APO/classschedule/fa2008/ . Questions may be directed to the office of the Dean of Humanities and Fine Arts, 530-898-5351.

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After School Professional Development Conference Starts July 28

Thursday, June 19th, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 19, 2008

Joe Wills
530-898-4143
Joe Picard,
Continuing Education
530-898-6105

After School Professional Development Conference Starts July 28

In collaboration with Butte County Office of Education’s Region 2 Learning Support program, California State University, Chico Center for Regional and Continuing Education will host Stepping Up To The Plate—After School Program Professional Development Institute, July 28 – August 1 on the CSU, Chico campus.

The conference will provide K-8 after school program paraprofessionals, coordinators and teaching staff the opportunity to explore ways to develop and improve their programs, facilitate experiential learning and promote a positive after school environment. Participants will also have the opportunity to develop new leadership skills, network with their peers and discover the emerging computer, Web and media technologies through hands-on labs.

“We are planning for an exciting conference. We have a full schedule of sessions hosted by experienced leaders who will present and discuss new approaches for those looking to create high-quality after school programs. This year we have added spectacular music and art performances, which will really enhance the experience,” said Amy Christianson, program coordinator, Butte County Office of Education.

Opening the conference will be a musical performance from the group CREW. The high-energy performance, modeled after the successful off-Broadway show STOMP, emphasizes leading a positive and healthy lifestyle by demonstrating hobbies as anti-drugs.

CREW will also present a public performance, July 28, 7:00 p.m. in the BMU Auditorium. Tickets are available at the University Box Office at 2nd and Normal Street, Chico, or at the door. For more information please visit http://www.csuchico.edu/upe/boxoffice.html or call 530-898-5917.

To conclude the conference, artist David Garibaldi will present his nationally acclaimed Rhythm and Hue performance art show. Garibaldi is known for his expressive, large-format paintings of pop icons that he creates live while incorporating inspirational messages for the audience.

Garibaldi’s Rhythm and Hue will begin August 1, 11:00 a.m. in the Performing Arts Building, room 144. This performance is free and open to the public.

Completed art from his performance will be available through an auction to raise funds for after school programs in the region.
For more information please visit http://rce.csuchico.edu/afterschool or call CSU, Chico Continuing Education, 530-898-6105.

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CSU, Chico Offers Trip to Peru and Machu Picchu

Wednesday, June 18th, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 18, 2008

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260
Thomasin Saxe,
College of Humanities and Fine Arts
530-898-4642

CSU, Chico Offers Trip to Peru and Machu Picchu

The College of Humanities and Fine Arts at California State University, Chico, is sponsoring a tour to Peru, including a visit to Machu Picchu. The trip is scheduled for 11 days, from Jan. 5 through Jan. 15, 2009.

The faculty-in-residence will be religious studies professor Andrew Flescher. He has traveled extensively in Brazil and spent one summer studying wildlife in the Amazon River basin. In January 2008, he served as the faculty-in-residence for the HFA tour to Ecuador, including the Galapagos Islands.

The tour will include three nights in Lima, five in Cuzco and one in Machu Picchu. Guided sightseeing tours include Lima, Cuzco and several Incan ruins, the Sacred Valley of the Incas and Machu Picchu.

Machu Picchu is located high in the Andes. A train will take visitors up Picchu Mountain and through the lush valleys that lead to the “Lost City of the Incas.” In Machu Picchu, travelers will see the stonework of the Temple of the Sun, the fountains of the Royal Sector, the views from the Temple of the Three Windows, the cave of the Temple of the Condor and the calendar of the Intihuatana.

“Just as I have in the past been humbled by the Amazon and the Galapagos, natural habitats innocent to the minutiae that plagues the rest of the contemporary world, I expect to be overwhelmed by the heart of the Incan empire,” said Flescher. “Machu Picchu, standing at 9,060 feet, was invisible to civilization below and is still regarded as one of the most coveted treasures of the ancient world. It was one of the first self-sustaining cities, irrigated by natural springs and built into its own surroundings. An eco-friendly paradise, Machu Picchu also served as an astronomical observatory, the top of which provides some of the world’s most spectacular views of the heavens above and the earth below.”

Machu Picchu worked its magic on the interim dean of HFA, Joel Zimbelman, almost 33 years ago, when he traveled there with his brother. “We went overland from South Dakota to Peru,” said Zimbelman, “a kind of ‘Motorcycle Diaries’ cultural experience by train, bus, plane and tramp steamer. Cuzco’s Inca fortifications and colonial squares provided the basis for a lifelong interest in Latin American indigenous culture and its colonial legacy.”

The highlight for Zimbelman was traveling along the Urubamba and exploring Machu Picchu. “Machu Picchu changed my view of travel and cultural exploration forever,” said Zimbelman. “It wasn’t just a tourist site—it was a cultural creation kept from the Spanish; the locus of an early and significant archeological dig in Latin America; a point of cultural pride for contemporary Peruvians; and the raw material at the center of the searing contemporary debate over the question ‘Who Owns Antiquity?’ I can still remember the climb by bus to its hidden location; the redolent smells of the mysterious jungle; the kids chattering as they sold trinkets and climbed on the slippery rocks; the clouds that continually shrouded and then revealed the architecture and terracing of this settlement. As we headed back to Cuzco after dusk, my brother and I admitted it was the best day we had ever had together in our lives.”

The Peru/Machu Picchu tour is organized through a professional tour company, and a tour director will accompany the tour throughout its visit to Peru. It is possible for CSU, Chico students to earn 1-3 units through the Department of Religious Studies.

For information, contact Thomasin Saxe, group coordinator and director of Special Projects, College of HFA, at 530-898-4642 or txase@csuchico.edu. To learn more about the HFA travel program, go to www.csuchico.edu/hfa/travel.

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Summer Programs Reach Out to Students Who Face Barriers to Higher Education

Tuesday, June 10th, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 9, 2008

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Summer Programs Reach Out to Students Who Face Barriers to Higher Education

As in past summers, California State University, Chico will host several groups of students looking to overcome obstacles to receiving a college education.

This Friday, June 13, 160 high school students from Sutter, Yuba, Glenn, Tehama, Colusa and Butte counties as well as four Hawaiian students will come to campus for a summer session sponsored by CSU, Chico’s Upward Bound program.

The students will attend classes and take part in planned activities Monday through Friday on campus, staying in the Mechoopda and Esken residence halls on campus before going home on the weekends. The students will also receive mentoring from faculty members on math and science projects this year. Before leaving June 24, the students will do the annual community service project, which again this year will be a clean-up of Bidwell Park.

Students qualify to be in the program based on income and/or whether they are the first generation in their family to graduate from college. CSU, Chico’s 42-year-old Upward Bound program has three projects assisting students with academic and personal development and career exploration as they progress in school and point toward a college education.

“We are giving a glimpse of what college life is like for students and their parents,” said Maria Moreno, assistant director of CSU, Chico’s Upward Bound program. “Most of them haven’t had the opportunities others have had to learn about college.”

Later this month, CSU, Chico’s American Language and Culture Institute (ALCI) is welcoming 30 Nevada-California International Consortium students from Tokyo, Japan, who will participate in this year’s ALCI Summer Bridge Program on campus.

The five-week ALCI Summer Bridge Program runs June 25 through Aug. 8 and features a combination of credit-bearing coursework, intensive English language coursework, academic preparation and cultural immersion.

Along with the classwork, students will get to travel in the North State, go to a Chico Outlaws game and experience other aspects of local and California culture. All of the students who are attending the ALCI Summer Bridge are preparing for admission to CSU, Chico, Butte College or Shasta College.

“Now in its 15th year, the Summer Bridge Program is ALCI’s marquee special program,” said William Dantona, ALCI director. “We are pleased to welcome our new international students to our beautiful campus and assist them in their academic preparation.”

Established in 1979, ALCI offers intensive English language programs for international students and professionals.

Next month, CSU, Chico’s Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) Summer Bridge Program will host 150 first-time freshmen to be housed in Lassen Hall. The week-long program beginning July 12 is geared to help low-income, first- generation college students make a smooth transition from high school to college.

Students will work closely with University faculty and staff, who will act as mentors, meeting with them in small groups to discuss workshop topics that will be presented throughout the week. Workshops are designed to help students enhance their decision-making skills, develop confidence, feel at home at CSU, Chico, utilize University resources and learn strategies to ensure success during their first year of college.

This summer, a large percentage of students’ time will be spent participating in a series of English workshops. English instructors and teaching assistants will focus on reading difficulties, helping students to develop their abilities to find, select, read and respond to published work on topics that are often covered at the college level. The goal is to enhance students’ reading abilities to help with writing assignments in the classroom and develop the students’ skills and confidence they’ll need to have success at CSU, Chico.

“Students will leave the Summer Bridge Program feeling a sense of family among their fellow students and the University professional staff,” said Chris Malone, associated director of EOP, which was started in 1968. “When they arrive back at Chico on Aug. 21 for orientation, they will not feel like strangers because they will have lots of friends to begin their new adventure as college freshmen.”

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Summer Course in Forensic Archaeology Offered

Thursday, June 5th, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 5, 2008

Joe Picard
Regional and Continuing Education
530-898-6105
Joe Wills
898-4143

Summer Course in Forensic Archaeology Offered

California State University, Chico Continuing Education, in collaboration with CSU, Chico’s Department of Anthropology, is pleased to present Forensic Archaeology: Field Recovery Methods, June 9-13.

This five-day intensive and rarely offered course focuses on the application of archaeology, anthropology, and forensic science to the location and recovery of human remains in the outdoor environment.

Students will learn search strategies for locating clandestine graves and mapping human remains as well as archaeological methods used for excavating, documenting and interpreting grave sites. They will also participate in simulated outdoor forensic scenes. Supplemental course material will include lectures on forensic anthropology, the recovery of burned remains from fire scenes and the role of archaeology and forensic anthropology in large scale investigations.

Field Recovery Methods is being taught by CSU, Chico anthropology faculty members Eric Bartelink, Turhon Murad and Georgia Fox; anthropology graduates Melanie Beasley and Kevin Dalton; and visiting forensic anthropologist Roland Wessling.

Wessling is a research officer in Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology at Cranfield University in the United Kingdom and is the forensic science and operations manager for the Inforce Foundation. He has worked on international cases in Bosnia, Croatia and Iraq, as well as domestic cases in Germany and the United Kingdom.

“This is a unique, affordable opportunity for students interested in forensic anthropology to gain valuable hands-on training from scientists with international experience in mass grave excavations and archaeology. The Department of Anthropology is dedicated to providing distinctive educational opportunities for our students. This is the first university course of its kind on the West Coast,” said Bartelink.

The California State University, Chico Forensic Anthropology Program is recognized internationally for its scholarly contributions to the field. CSU, Chico is one of two universities with three practicing forensic anthropologists and one of a few universities that support two forensic anthropologists that are American Board of Forensic Anthropology certified. For more than 35 years, the CSU, Chico Forensic Anthropology Program has offered its identification services through the Physical Anthropology Human Identification Laboratory (PAHIL). The lab has proven to be a valuable investigative resource for government agencies throughout the country.

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New Research Fellowship Honors Fly Fishing Legend Press Powell

Wednesday, June 4th, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 4,, 2008

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

New Research Fellowship Honors Fly Fishing Legend Press Powell

A research award funded by the Chico Area Flyfishers to study angling, fisheries or aquatic sciences on Big Chico Creek has been awarded to a California State University, Chico student.

The award is named in honor of Press Powell, a third-generation owner-operator of the world-renowned Powell Rod Company of Chico, who passed away in 2004.

Heather Bowan, a CSU, Chico graduate student in biological sciences, is the first recipient of the Chico Area Flyfishers’ Press Powell Research Fellowship, which was established this spring. Bowan is doing research under the direction of CSU, Chico biology professor Michael Marchetti.

The fellowships will be up to $1,000 and awarded on an annual basis. The Chico Area Flyfishers Board will approve the awards and work with the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve director, Jeff Mott, on implementation and review of the project.

Mott said Bowan’s project will study juvenile Chinook salmon. After they hatch, the salmon spend time in the fresh water of Big Chico Creek before heading to the Sacramento River on their long voyage to the Pacific Ocean. Mott said the research will examine the importance of tributary streams, like Big Chico Creek, in the survival of the juvenile Chinook salmon. Mott said the fellowship award will be spent on equipment used to study the salmon.

Powell was a Chico High and CSU, Chico graduate who traveled extensively in the U.S., Europe and Japan fly-fishing and promoting and selling his highly regarded fly rods. He was well known for his love of fishing on Big Chico Creek above Bidwell Park despite his familiarity with fly-fishing waters around the world.

“When Press Powell passed away, we thought this fellowship would be a fitting way to honor him,” said Eric See, Chico Area Flyfishers board member. “He introduced me to Big Chico Creek, and said it was one of the most productive streams we had.”

See said Big Chico Creek is home to two threatened species, the Central Valley spring run Chinook and the Central Valley steelhead. Big Chico also has a rainbow trout fishery, he said. “We were very pleased when the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve protected this area,” See said.

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Chico Performances Announces 2008–2009 Season of Performers

Wednesday, June 4th, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 4, 2008

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260
Daran Goodsell
Marketing Coordinator,
Chico Performances
530-898-6785

Chico Performances Announces 2008–2009 Season of Performers

During its annual “Thank-You” party in May, Chico Performances announced its 2008–2009 season performances. Asleep at the Wheel, the multiple Grammy-winning Country Western swing band, will kick off the season beginning on Aug. 27, and the final performance in May 2009 will be a children’s production of “Beauty and The Beast Jr.”

Highlights of the upcoming season include Linda Ronstadt, performing with Mariachi Los Camperos de Nati Cano; an evening with Lily Tomlin; “Nunsense,” starring Sally Struthers; and musicians Natalie MacMaster, David Grisman and John Sebastian. Tommy Emmanuel will headline the annual Chico World Music Festival.

For families, Chico Performances is offering family performances including the Peking Acrobats and Mad Science presents CSI: Live! For those who are interested in dance shows, Chico Performances will be bringing “The Nutcracker” as the annual holiday ballet, The Best of Momix and Ailey II.

Jazz groups on the lineup include Preservation Hall Jazz Band, SF JAZZ Collective and ICONS: Turtle Island String Quartet featuring Cyrus Chestnut. For lovers of symphonic music, the San Francisco Symphony with Michael Tilson Thomas will visit Laxson.

For those who enjoy Americana music, David Grisman and John Sebastian will be performing together. Other musical performances include Leo Kottke and Loudon Wainwright III, Joe Craven and Laura Love and Orville Johnson, Chris Thile and the Punch Brothers, and Laurie Lewis and Tom Rozum with Rani Arbo and Daisy Mayhem.

For world music aficionados, Chico Performances is bringing the Soweto Gospel Choir, a performance by the Afro-Cuban All Stars and Dya Singh, world music group from Australia.

Series tickets (one ticket to at least six different performances) will go on sale July 1. Individual tickets will go on sale Aug. 4.

A video season preview is available at the Chico performances Web site at www.chicoperformances.com. More information on these upcoming performances will be added to the Web site within a few weeks.

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Waste Diversion Program at Residence Halls Nets More Than 17,000 Pounds of Reusable and Recyclable Goods

Monday, June 2nd, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 2, 2008

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Waste Diversion Program at Residence Halls Nets More Than 17,000 Pounds of Reusable and Recyclable Goods

Diversion Excursion 08California State University, Chico’s award-winning Diversion Excursion program once again diverted thousands of pounds of reusable and recyclable goods from the landfill as residence hall students moved out for the summer.

In its ninth year as a partnership between University Housing and Food Service (UHFS) and Associated Students Recycling, Diversion Excursion netted 17,595 pounds of electronics, clothes, canned goods, furniture and other items.

As CSU, Chico students moved out of residence halls May 22 and 23, 160 volunteers at nine stations in the central campus as well as University Village took donations of goods, sorted them and prepared them for new uses.

Luisa Garza, lead groundsworker for UHFS and developer of the program, said the total was very similar to last year. “We had a truckload of computers, quite a few televisions and tons of clothes.” She said the program accepts batteries, textbooks, magazines, office supplies and many other items as long as they are not actual trash.

The program partners with local charities and businesses to provide them with goods. Some of the recipients this year were:
• ARC Thrift Store – 7,038 pounds of clothing, books, dishes and other similar types of goods
• Esplanade House – 4,015 pounds of nonperishable foods, partially used shampoo, conditioner, laundry and dish soap and some clothing
• Torres Homeless Shelter – 1,155 pounds of nonperishable food and some clothing
• Computers for Classrooms – 525 pounds of computer items repaired or recycled for use by local schools
• Square Deal Mattress Factory – 460 pounds of foam egg crate bed pads recycled

In addition, AS Recycling accepted 3,864 pounds of cans, bottles, paper and other recyclable materials.

Students are alerted to the program through information tables and class presentations, and “move out” bins are placed in the residence halls several days early as reminders.

In 2006, CSU, Chico received the Sustainable Operations Best Practices award at UC Santa Barbara’s sustainability conference for the Diversion Excursion program as well as the reuse and waste diversion of portable buildings removed from campus.

“Other campuses have modeled similar programs on ours – we are a leader in this area,” said Robyn DiFalco, Associated Students Recycling coordinator. “The program has a big impact on the people who participate – not just the volunteers, but also the residents. Many had no idea how much stuff is recyclable. They realize they are making a difference.”

Added Garza: “Diversion Excursion accomplishes a lot. We divert 17,000 pounds of recyclable material. We get positive response from housing residents, and some of those ex-residents return to volunteer. The community recognizes that Chico State students – who give their time on the last two days of finals week – are making a commitment. And it shows the charities that college students can be generous.”

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Join the Annual Butterfly Census on Friday, June 6

Monday, June 2nd, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 2, 2008

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260
Jeff Mott, Director
Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve
Butte Creek Ecological Preserve
530-898-5010

Join the Annual Butterfly Census on Friday, June 6

On Friday, June 6, entomologist Don Miller, Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Chico and the staff from the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve (BCCER) will be conducting the second annual butterfly count on the reserve and surrounding areas. This is a national census effort under the direction of the North American Butterfly Association (NABA) Butterfly Counts.

The NABA Butterfly Counts is an ongoing program to census the butterflies of North America (United States, Canada and partially Mexico) and to publish the results. Volunteer participants select a count area with a 15-mile diameter and conduct a one-day census of all butterflies sighted within that circle. You can find more details on NABA at http://www.naba.org/counts.html.

If you wish to participate in this annual census, please contact Jeff Mott at jmott@csuchico.edu to sign up. Volunteers will meet at the barn of the reserve at 8:30 am. Participants should bring a lunch, plenty of drinking water, hat, sunscreen and hiking boots.

You don’t need to be a butterfly expert to join the census but you will need to be prepared for a day of hiking and learning about these amazing insects.

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Cognitive Behaviorist Will Offer Two-Day Conference for Educators and Mental Health Professionals

Monday, May 19th, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 19, 2008

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260
Steve Koch
Professional Studies in Education
530-898-4850

Cognitive Behaviorist Will Offer Two-Day Conference for Educators and Mental Health Professionals

Jill S. Compton, PhD, Duke University, will offer training in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) June 25 and 26, 2008, on the CSU, Chico campus. In addition, there will be a half-day session on June 27 on applying DBT principles in the classroom. The Department of Professional Studies in Education and Butte County Behavioral Health are co-sponsoring the conference as part of the In Service to Families, Children and the Courts Program.

DBT was developed in the early 1990s by Dr. Marsha Linehan to treat people who struggle with borderline personality disorder, suicidal thoughts, self-mutilation, food and drug abuse, out-of-control emotions and associated depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. It uses an innovative blend of behavior therapy, paradox, humor and compassion.

Compton has provided training in DBT in several states and actively practices DBT as well as supervises a cadre of doctoral interns in its use at Duke University. She is currently implementing a DBT program in a high school setting in Chapel Hill, N.C. Her research interests include DBT applications and treating depression with elderly persons.

During the two-day overview conference on Wednesday and Thursday, June 25 and 26, Compton will cover the theoretical foundations of DBT, common clinical strategies and practical guidelines for effective implementation of DBT with challenging adolescents and adults.

In the half-day session on Friday, June 27, Compton will guide educators in applying the principles of emotional regulation to challenging school classrooms.

The sessions are intended for educators, psychologists, marriage and family therapists, physicians, nurses or mediators who work with people facing a wide range of mental health challenges.

Further information is available at http://rce.csuchico.edu/inservice/dbt.asp or by calling 530-898-6105. Partial scholarships may be available for educators through a federal grant secured by the CSU, Chico Special Education Program. Contact Steve Koch at spkoch@csuchico.edu.

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