Archive for the ‘2007 Fall’ Category

Rare Mandala to be Created at Beginning of Spring Semester

Friday, December 21st, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 21, 2007

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Rare Mandala to be Created at Beginning of Spring Semester

Rare MandalaMonkAs California State University, Chico students return to campus for the spring 2008 semester, they will be treated to a rare sand mandala being created by a well-known Tibetan scholar and teacher.

The Venerable Lama Losang Samten, founder of the Tibetan Buddhist Center of Philadelphia, will be creating the Kalachakra sand mandala in the ground floor mall of the Bell Memorial Union from Jan. 28 until March 1.

Samten has special permission from His Holiness, The Dalai Lama, to create this intricate, multi-hued mandala, known as The Wheel of Time. He will be working on the mandala from about 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays to Sundays, taking time during the day to discuss the project with interested parties.

While in Chico to create the mandala, Samten will also be speaking to some CSU, Chico classes and will participate in the Tibetan Cultural Festival, to be held Feb. 16 and 17 at the Masonic Family Center in Chico.

Born in central Tibet, Samten and his family fled the country in 1959 and resettled in Nepal and later India. As a boy, he became a Buddhist monk and joined the Namgyal Monastery. In 1988, he came to the United States at the direction of the Dalai Lama to demonstrate the meditative art of sand painting. Since then, he has created sand mandalas at museums and universities around the world.

Samten has established Tibetan Buddhist centers in Hartford and El Paso as well as Philadelphia. In 1995, he gave back his monastic vows to lead a lay practitioner’s life of scholarship and teaching. In 1995-96, he was a visiting scholar at the University of Pennsylvania, teaching the Tibetan language.

Sponsors for the event include the CSU, Chico Peace Institute; the Religious Studies Student Society; Psi Chi, the psychology student honor society; and Sigma Tau Delta, the English student honor society.

Lyn Dean, CSU, Chico Peace Institute board member and an organizer of the event, said every detail of the Kalachakra mandala has symbolic meaning and represents the progression toward a state of awakening and inner peace.

Dean said the public is invited to take part in opening and closing ceremonies. On Jan. 28, sand for the mandala will be ritually collected. After the mandala is completed on March 1, some of the sand used will be distributed to those present, and some returned to nearby Chico Creek.

To participate in the event or for more information, contact Dean at 879-0972.

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Students in Club Sports Collect Food for Those in Need

Friday, December 21st, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 21, 2007

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Students in Club Sports Collect Food for Those in Need

fooddrive.jpgCalifornia State University, Chico’s competitive collegiate sport clubs collected 1,242 cans and other food items in 10 days this month as part of a holiday food drive to benefit the Jesus Center in Chico.

The students greatly exceeded last year’s total of 475 items in the second year of collecting food for those less fortunate in the community. In prior years, the student athletes had collected toys for needy families.

“The clubs did a great job with this food drive,” said Mary Wallmark, director of sports clubs for CSU, Chico. “It was exciting for the students to bring the food to the Jesus Center and see how gracious the staff was in accepting it. What an opportunity it was for these students – hopefully the experience of giving can become a lifelong habit for them.”

CSU, Chico has one of the oldest and largest club sports programs in the state of California. Among the 26 programs are club teams that compete against other colleges.

The competitive sport clubs that took part in the food drive are cycling, field hockey, inline hockey, men’s and women’s rugby, men’s and women’s lacrosse, women’s soccer, men’s and women’s ultimate, men’s and women’s water polo, men’s and women’s volleyball and wakeboard.

The annual holiday food drive is headed up by the Sport Club Council, CSU, Chico’s governing body for competitive clubs on campus.

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Enrollment Opens for Localization Certification Programs

Tuesday, December 18th, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 18, 2007

Joe Picard, Continuing Education
530-898-6105
Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Enrollment Opens for Localization Certification Programs

California State University, Chico, Center for Regional and Continuing Education, the Globalization and Localization Association and the Localization Institute announce early enrollment for the 2008 Localization Certification Program and Localization Project Management Certification.

These localization programs address the organizational practices and software tools designed to avoid costly problems such as poor language translations, culturally insensitive designs and cultural gaffes on Web sites that alienate customers.

The Localization Certification Program will be offered on the campus of EUROMED Marseille Ecole de Management, Marseille, France, March 31-April 2, and on the campus of Saint Louis University, at the Boeing Institute of International Business, St. Louis, USA, June 16-18.

The Localization Project Management Certification will be presented April 3-4 at EUROMED Marseille Ecole de Management and June 19-20 at Saint Louis University.

Now in its third year, the Localization Certification Program was developed by industry experts, representing the leading professional associations, publishers and academic institutions in the field, in response to the growing demand for localization professionals. More than 150 professionals have now received certification through the program.

“The localization industry continues to mature, as more and more businesses and organizations are learning the positive value of ‘localizing’ their products and services with properly translated messages and culturally sensitive Web sites,” said Professor Nitish Singh, Saint Louis University. “The industry has now topped more than $8.8 billion in translation and localization services, and our current research demonstrates that there is more room for growth and improvement in this emerging market.” The localization certification program includes 45 hours of online course work on topics such as global Web site development, cultural adaptation of user interfaces, software internationalization and multilingual content management for global enterprises.

After completing the online instruction, participants will attend a three-day intensive workshop where modules on strategies and processes for today’s industry will be presented. The workshop will be followed by a certification exam.

Faculty and experts from the industry will present the latest approaches, tools, and applications and workshop participants will benefit from a substantial number of hours of hands-on software training in the emerging localization tools and technologies.

“Our presenters represent some of the major leaders in localization,” said Boris Bartikowski, associate professor of marketing, EUROMED Marseille Ecole de Management. “Last year we hosted experts from Lionbridge, Oracle, SDL Trados, Idiom Technologies, Microsoft, Cisco and HP, just to name a few. We will also highlight leading businesses who emulate best-practices and working professionals who serve the industry with advanced applications and approaches to localization.”

New this year is the offering of the Localization Project Management Certification in Europe. This advanced training in project management will provide more in-depth professional development for participants.
Individuals who successfully complete the Localization Certification Program will be eligible for American Translators Association continuing education credits.

Translators, product marketing managers, Web project managers, business development executives, Web developers and designers, Web application developers, global entrepreneurs, localization professionals, international trade representatives, educators and students in the field are encourage to take advantage of these certification programs.

The program receives additional support through “MultiLingual Computing,” a respected publication and news resource in the localization trade.

For more information on the Localization Certification Program and the Localization Project Management Certification please visit the web site or call the California State University, Chico Continuing Education office at 1-530-898-6105.

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CSU, Chico Receives National Teacher Training Accreditation

Thursday, December 13th, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 13, 2007

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

CSU, Chico Receives National Teacher Training Accreditation

California State University, Chico’s School of Education has received national accreditation by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

An 18-person team comprised of national and state university and K-12 representatives evaluated the University’s teacher preparation programs during a site visit last April, and the NCATE board notified CSU, Chico President Paul Zingg of accreditation last month.

Phyllis Fernlund, dean of the College of Education and Communication, said, “NCATE accreditation is a nationally recognized mark of distinction for Chico State. All of the programs that prepare educators on our campus have now met rigorous national standards in addition to the California program requirements.”

While national accreditation is voluntary in California, Fernlund said that the University “took on this challenge because accreditation is about accountability and our responsibility, at the undergraduate and graduate levels, to prepare the finest teachers, administrators, counselors, reading specialists and librarians for our schools.”

The NCATE accreditation will assist CSU, Chico teacher credential graduates in their future job pursuits, Fernlund said. For instance, many states will accept the teaching credentials of an out-of-state applicant from an NCATE-accredited school, she said.

The extensive accreditation process involved interviews with 700 teachers, administrators and students to see if the University met a range of national standards for the preparation of teachers.

One NCATE team leader, during the spring 2007 visit, described a group of CSU, Chico credential students as “the most professional I’ve ever seen.”

Fernlund said she was particularly pleased that CSU, Chico received NCATE accreditation on its first attempt. “Institutions going through initial NCATE accreditation often falter when they try to meet NCATE Standard 2,” she said, “which requires an assessment system that measures the university students’ achievement of each standard and requires evidence that faculty use assessment data to continually improve our programs.”

President Zingg said, “Gaining NCATE accreditation on our first try is strong testimony to the quality of our education programs and the faculty and staff who design and deliver them. It’s also a reflection of the confidence we have in our willingness to stand the test of this kind of national scrutiny.”

The School of Education has approximately 450 students enrolled in teaching credential and graduate programs and 340 student teachers working in more than 100 K-12 schools. One half of School of Education faculty members speak two or more languages, one third have taught overseas and all have taught two or more years in public schools.

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Staff Council Creates Christmas for 210 Children

Thursday, December 13th, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 13, 2007

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260
Terry Battle, Staff Council
530-898-4898

Staff Council Creates Christmas for 210 Children

Needy ChildrenThe Staff Council at California State University, Chico is in its 22nd year of sponsoring the Needy Children’s Gift Program, and it’s been another wonderful year for the program. This year 210 children from 91 families will receive gifts through the generosity of departments and offices within the University. Some local businesses also participate.

“The generosity of people on campus who participate in the Needy Children’s Gift Program is heartwarming,” said Dana Francis, chair of the Staff Council’s service projects committee. “There is no better way to show my appreciation for all I’ve been blessed with than by giving to local families and children who might not have gifts to open or food to eat on Christmas. Although I am unable to see the families open their gifts, I can only imagine their excitement, and that makes my heart feel good!”

In the fall, departments and offices are assigned a family, and then individuals in the offices buy gifts for each child, beginning with necessities such as clothing and warm coats. The value of gifts for each child ranges from $100 to $150. This year, a generous donor made it possible for every young child in the program to receive a stuffed animal.

In addition to their other gifts, each family also receives a food certificate for a minimum of $45. Staff Council holds an event each fall to raise funds for the certificates, which are supplemented by cash gifts from the departments.

Social workers from various agencies will pick up the gifts today at the University Farm for the families they recommended. Even though the volunteers from Staff Council don’t meet the families, the excitement and gratitude of the social workers conveys a strong message about how these gifts will be appreciated.

The program started in 1985 with only 17 families and has grown through the years. It, along with campus blood drives, is one of the largest projects Staff Council sponsors. “The primary focus of Staff Council projects is that they benefit staff, then the University community, and then the larger community,” said Terry Battle, chair of Staff Council. “It is wonderful that so many people in the University have helped it grow and that so many families can benefit.”

Staff Council begins working on plans for the program in October, contacting agencies and social workers, who select the families and help them fill out wish lists, which are then handed out to participating divisions in the University. Social workers choose families on the basis of need. Families are recipients in the program only once.

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Grossman Family Contributes $5,000 to SAGE for Environmental Stewardship Prizes

Tuesday, December 11th, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 11, 2007

Joe Wills
530-898-4143
Curtis DeBerg, College of Business
530-898-4824

Grossman Family Contributes $5,000 to SAGE for Environmental Stewardship Prizes

Katie Gonser and her husband, Ken Grossman, co-founder of Sierra Nevada Brewing Company, today announced sponsorship of the SAGE Award for Environmental Stewardship. This award was made to the Students for the Advancement of Global Entrepreneurship (SAGE) program at California State University, Chico, to be distributed to high school students who display the most creativity, innovation and effectiveness at launching environmental ventures.

With these funds, the Grossmans hope to encourage high school SAGE teams to create ventures that are environmentally sound and sustainable and to develop the next generation of environmental leaders.

SAGE is a global program initiated by Curtis DeBerg, business professor at CSU, Chico. The program links high school students to mentors from local universities and businesses. Its purpose is to advance global entrepreneurship in an ethical and socially responsible manner.

“We are extremely grateful to Katie Gonser and Ken Grossman for their leadership in sponsoring this award,” said DeBerg. “This will give an exciting and important new focus to SAGE, while helping young students locally and globally.”

The awards will be distributed to high schools in spring 2008, when they compete in regional, state and country SAGE competitions. A total of $500 will be awarded to the best three environmental ventures completed by California high school SAGE teams at the California SAGE tournament in April, and $1,000 will be awarded to the best three ventures at the USA SAGE tournament in May. The best three environmental ventures completed by high schools competing in the Sixth SAGE World Cup in Abuja, Nigeria, in July 2008, will be awarded prize money of $2,000, $1,000 and $500, respectively.

DeBerg sees the SAGE Award for Environmental Stewardship as aligned with the University’s strategic priorities. “The sixth priority says that we will create environmentally literate citizens, who embrace sustainability as a way of living,” said DeBerg. “With university students working hand-in-hand with high school students to create sustainable ventures, our youth have a direct say in what their futures hold. Their individual and collective actions truly have environmental and economic impact.”

The award will be made annually for each of the next three years, with future funding to be determined after that time period.

For more information contact Dr. Curtis DeBerg, California State University, Chico, SAGE, 530-898-4824, cdeberg@sageglobal.org, skype id: cdeberg.

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College of Agriculture Staff Member and Students Win Top Honors at State Young Farmers and Ranchers Discussion Meet

Monday, December 10th, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 10, 2007

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260

College of Agriculture Staff Member and Students Win Top Honors at State Young Farmers and Ranchers Discussion Meet

College of Agriculture Outreach Coordinator Shannon Douglass and student Grace Berryhill won top prizes in two divisions of the state Young Farmers and Ranchers Discussion Meet held as part of the California Farm Bureau Federation Annual Meeting in Sparks, Nev., the first weekend in December. Douglass won the open competition for 18- to 35-year-old members, and Berryhill placed first in the separate Collegiate Discussion Meet.

A seven-member CSU, Chico team—Jenny Williams, an agricultural business major from Butte County; Garrett Driver, an agricultural education major from Yolo County; Sam Cooley, an agricultural business major from Solano County; Sarah Hubbart, an agricultural communications major from Placer County; Jolene Moxon, an animal science major from Humboldt County; Callie Borror, an agricultural business major from Tehama County; and Berryhill of Tulare County—also won the Collegiate Team Competition.

Douglass, a 2005 graduate in animal science with a minor in agricultural business and a Glenn County rancher, discussed the need for new water development. She was one of 11 contestants from around the state. Participants are judged on their ability to exchange ideas and information, think logically and solve problems cooperatively.

Douglass will receive more than $4,000 in cash prizes and a Dodge pickup truck for her winning discussion. She will compete at the national American Farm Bureau Federation Convention in January.

Berryhill, a junior at CSU, Chico, earned first prize of $500 in the Collegiate Discussion Meet. She is an agricultural education/animal science double major with a minor in Spanish. She will represent California at the Young Farmers and Ranchers National Convention in February.

The finals of the Collegiate Discussion Meet focused on the role of U.S. agriculture in responding to global issues that include trade, climate change and the threat of agricultural terrorism.

Douglass coached the winning collegiate team, which had been studying and practicing since September. “All of their hard work really paid off,” said Douglass. “The students competed in discussions about water rights, property rights, global issues and the public perception of the family farm. It is a very worthwhile competition that not only hones their public speaking skills, but also teaches them about the pressing issues facing the agriculture industry. Students are judged on their knowledge of the agriculture industry, presentation skills and cooperative attitude.”

The Butte County Farm Bureau sponsored the trip to Sparks to compete. It is part of the California Farm Bureau Federation (CFBF), the state’s largest farm organization. The Young Farmers and Ranchers program, part of the CFBF, encourages members aged 18 to 35 to be active leaders in agriculture.

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Effects of Early Life Stress on Brain Development Is Focus of 6th Annual Children in Trauma Conference

Thursday, December 6th, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 6, 2007

Joe Wills
530-898-4143
Joe Picard, Continuing Education
530-898-6105

Effects of Early Life Stress on Brain Development Is Focus of 6th Annual Children in Trauma Conference

CarrionCalifornia State University, Chico Continuing Education, in partnership with Butte County Family Court Services, Superior Court of California, presents Children in Trauma 2008: Helping Children Survive Trauma: Early Life Stress, Brain Development and Effective Interventions. The two-day professional development conference will be held Jan. 11-12, 2008, at the Bell Memorial Union Auditorium on the CSU, Chico campus.

The 6th annual Children in Trauma Conference will provide an intensive two-day practicum focusing on how traumatic stress can alter early child development and how professionals working in the field can recognize this problem and learn how to apply the emerging intervention and treatment protocols.

The conference will feature internationally recognized researcher and educator Victor G. Carrion, MD, associate professor, Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and director of the Stanford Early Life Stress Research Program.

Carrion’s research looks at the interplay between brain development and stress vulnerability via a unique multi-method approach that includes psychophysiology, neuro-imaging, neuroendocrinology and phenomenology.

Carrion is a noted practitioner known for his development of successful individual and community-based interventions for stress-related conditions in children and adolescents who experience traumatic stress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Marriage and family therapists, social workers, psychologists, educators, school and family counselors, attorneys, law enforcement professionals, mediators, child custody evaluators, behavioral health professionals, nurses, physicians, psychoanalysts, emergency responders, children’s advocates and concerned individuals are encouraged to take advantage of this continuing education opportunity. In addition to learning from a recognized scholar and practitioner, participants will walk away from this conference with an array of professional contacts and practical treatment tools.

Participants may earn 12 hours of BBSE (Provider PCE 799), BRN (Provider 00656), MCEP (Provider CAL123), MCLE and CME continuing education credit.
In addition to the featured speaker, exhibitors from public service agencies and other resource providers will be on hand to share a wide array of information and discuss their services. Exhibitor space is available.

Early registration fee (received before Jan. 9, 2008) for the two-day conference is $279 per person (includes continental breakfast, lunch and materials). Group rate discounts are also available.

To enroll or for more information, please call CSU, Chico Continuing Education at 530-898-6105, e-mail rce@csuchico.edu, or visit the Web site.

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Entrepreneur and Author Jack Schultz to speak at Tri County Economic Forecast Conference

Thursday, December 6th, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 6, 2007

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260
Amy Terhorst
Event and Sponsorship Manager
Center for Economic Development, CSU, Chico
530-898-3857

Entrepreneur and Author Jack Schultz to speak at Tri County Economic Forecast Conference

Jack Schultz, author of Boomtown USA: The 7 ½ Keys to Big Success in Small Towns, will be the keynote speaker at the 8th Annual Tri County Economic Forecast Conference hosted by the California State University, Chico Center for Economic Development. The conference takes place Thursday, Jan. 17, from 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Bell Memorial Union on the CSU, Chico campus.

“The Tri County Economic Forecast Conference is a vital part of our mission to foster community leadership development and entrepreneurship in the North State,” said CSU, Chico President Paul Zingg, “I encourage businesses to take advantage of the information and networking available through this opportunity.”

Other conference speakers include Nancy Sidhu, vice president and senior economist with the Los Angeles Economic Development Corporation; John Mitchell, economist with Bancorp; and David Gallo, economist with CSU, Chico.

The conference provides attendees with useful insight and knowledge about the economic trends in Butte, Glenn, and Tehama counties, and will include a significant emphasis on the local economies including issues, opportunities and challenges each of the counties are facing. Panel discussions will also take place with local community members.

More than 350 businesses and community members attended the 2007 Tri County Economic Forecast Conference, and more than 400 are expected at this year’s event.

The conference is sponsored in part by Pacific Gas & Electric, KPAY-1290 News Talk, Chico Enterprise-Record, The Graphic Fox, Ink Feather Falls Casino, Butte Community Bank, The Paradise Post and Umpqua Bank.

The mission of the CED is to educate and build the knowledge and capacity of California economic development professionals and enhance the well-being of the region’s citizens by facilitating sustained, long-term and coordinated economic development strategies.

Registration for the conference is $65 until Jan. 9 and includes breakfast, attendee packet and a 2008 Economic Profile. Registration after Jan. 9 is $85. Registration is available online at www.csuchico.edu/cedp or by calling (530) 898-4598. For more information, contact Amy Terhorst at amy@empireevents.net.

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Agriculture Student Will Be Youth Ambassador for Beef Industry

Friday, November 30th, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 30, 2007

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260

Agriculture Student Will Be Youth Ambassador for Beef Industry

Michelle Wiggley, a native of Red Bluff and an agricultural student at California State University, Chico, received an honorable mention award at the National Beef Competition held in New Orleans in October. Wiggley will become a member of the National Beef Ambassador team and will travel throughout the United States in 2008 addressing beef industry issues.

Wiggley was one of 21 contestants from throughout the country who competed for the title of 2008 National Beef Ambassador at the annual competition. The contest is funded through the Beef Checkoff Program and gives youth an opportunity to learn about the importance of the beef industry while honing their public speaking skills.

To qualify for the national contest, Wiggley was recognized as the California Beef Ambassador during the state competition held in May. The state contest was organized by the California CattleWomen, Inc. and cosponsored by the California Beef Council. Wiggley’s speech focused on the nutritional attributes of beef and the variety of beef choices that consumers have to choose from.

The national Beef Checkoff Program was established as part of the 1985 Farm Bill. Checkoff revenues may be used for promotion, education and research and programs to improve the marketing.

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