Archive for the ‘2006 Spring’ Category

Workshop on Culturally Customizing Web Sites Attracts 80 Participants from Seven Countries

Monday, June 19th, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 19, 2006

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Workshop on Culturally Customizing Web Sites Attracts 80 Participants from Seven Countries

What is it worth to businesses to have good language translations and culturally sensitive designs on Web sites that market international products? Billions of dollars, according to California State University, Chico professors who are hosting a training on campus this week for 80 participants from seven countries in how to customize Web sites for different cultures.

CSU, Chico's College of Business has the country's first comprehensive program in what is called e-business localization, thanks to a grant from the Business International Education Program, U.S. Department of Education, and matching funds from the University and private businesses for a total of a $502,000.

Localization experts from Google, Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard and other industry leaders will be presenting during the CSU, Chico training workshop, which starts tomorrow, June 20, and runs through June 22 in Glenn Hall on the CSU, Chico campus.

CSU, Chico business professor Nitish Singh, coordinator of the training, said participants will learn about organizational practices and new software tools designed to avoid costly problems such as poor language translations and cultural gaffes that alienate customers.

Shekhar Misra, chair of CSU, Chico's Department of Finance and Marketing and an expert in international marketing, said U.S. companies can be at a disadvantage in the international marketplace when it comes to e-business. "Many other competitors, such as the Europeans, have a leg up, because of their greater familiarity with multiple languages and cultures," Misra said.

Singh, co-author of "The Cultural Customized Web Site," said that language is not the only parameter. Colors, numbers, symbols and other elements that may be on a Web page hold different meanings in different cultures, and can offend if used insensitively, he said. Singh said some examples are:

- The swastika, which is a symbol used by many ancient cultures, including Hindu and Buddhist cultures, but became the symbol of Nazi Germany;
- The number four, which means bad luck or debt in Japan;
- The color white, which symbolizes purity in a Western-style wedding dress but is worn by widows in parts of Asia and is not welcome at joyous occasions.

Singh said localization is now an $8 billion business worldwide. One industry leader, Massachusetts-based Lionbridge, has offices in 25 countries and estimated annual revenues at $400 million.

Workshop participants range from corporate employees charged with localizing e-business sites to students specializing in international marketing, Singh said.

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CSU, Chico to Host Botany 2006, Centennial Celebration of the Botanical Society of America

Friday, June 9th, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 9, 2006

Joe Wills
530-898-4143
Joe Picard, Regional & Continuing Education
530-898-6105

CSU, Chico to Host Botany 2006, Centennial Celebration of the Botanical Society of America

An anticipated 1,000 scientists and students from around the country will visit Chico next month for Botany 2006, the joint annual meeting of the Botanical Society of America, the American Society of Plant Taxonomists, the American Fern Society and the American Bryological and Lichenological Society.

Botany 2006 has special significance as it will be the 100th anniversary celebration of the Botanical Society of America. The conference will be hosted on the California State University, Chico campus July 28-Aug. 3.

CSU, Chico's Center for Economic Development estimates that lodging, meals and other spending by meeting attendees will mean $711,000 for the local economy.

The meeting will include a full schedule of more than 850 scientific presentations, papers, posters, lectures, symposia and workshops from prominent botanists whose contributions have shaped and advanced the varied fields of plant biology. Also included on the schedule will be a full slate of field trips that will demonstrate the unique botanical nature of Northern California.

The full conference begins July 31 with "The Lessons of History: A Historian Reflects on 100 years of American Botany," a presentation by Vassiliki Betty Smocovitis, professor of zoology and history, University of Florida.

On Aug. 2, Peter Raven, former home secretary of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and president of the Missouri Botanical Garden, and Edward Schneider, Botanical Society president and CEO of the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, will host a special awards ceremony to honor more than 100 scientists who have contributed significantly to the advancement of plant biology and the Botanical Society.

The 5th Educational and Outreach Forum, for teachers and professors who teach biology and plant science, will take place July 29-30. The forum will include interactive sessions and a keynote lecture by Indiana University biology professor Roger Hangarter. Hangarter is internationally recognized for his scholarly work and his strong record of public outreach, sharing his passion for plants with community groups, children, teachers and museums throughout the country. His talk is titled "Communicating an Awareness of Plants through Science and Art."

"CSU, Chico is happy to host this important academic conference. For a few days this summer, Chico will be the place to be if you are a botanist. It's a great opportunity for local teachers to meet the researchers in the field, for our professors to network with colleagues, and for Chico to welcome hundreds of guests to our city and the North State," commented Kristina Schierenbeck, herbarium director and professor of biological sciences at CSU, Chico.

CSU, Chico Continuing Education is coordinating the local arrangements for the Botanical Society of America. For more information please visit http://www.2006.botanyconference.org.

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National Entrepreneurship Competition Prelude to World Contest

Wednesday, June 7th, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 7, 2006

Joe Wills
530-898-4143
Curt DeBerg, Department of Accounting and Management Information Systems
530-898-4824

National Entrepreneurship Competition Prelude to World Contest

Two California high schools were among the top finishers in a competition in New York May 26 that showcased student-run entrepreneurship programs. The event -founded by a California State University, Chico business professor-culminates in an international entrepreneurship competition in Shanghai, China, Aug. 3-6.

In partnership with City University of New York Institute for Virtual Enterprise, SAGE (Students for the Advancement of Global Entrepreneurship) held its fourth annual national competition at Kingsborough Community College in Brooklyn.

Nine high school teams and more than 100 students took part in the national competition after winning regional competitions. The teams were judged on entrepreneurship, community outreach, civic engagement, environmental responsibility, use of college mentors and use of a business advisory board.

The winner of the competition was a team from Santa Monica High School, which runs a café and school store that fund college scholarships for students. "This is pretty much unbelievable. People are hugging each other, crying. I can't believe we won," Chris Peterson, a senior at Santa Monica High, said. "I mean, we were up against the best of the best, and we just came out on top."

Second place was awarded to Gem State Academy in Idaho, third to Pleasant Valley High School in Chico, CA, and fourth prize to Northwestern Lehigh High School in Pennsylvania. "Each school, student, and teacher is considered a winner in SAGE. We are constantly amazed by the caliber of the students' projects, written and oral reports, and generosity," said Allison Smith, a CSU, Chico student who is part of the planning team for the event.

National competitions are also taking place this spring in China, Russia, Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, Ukraine, Philippines, Tajikistan and Kazakhstan. Each country's winner advances to the SAGE World Cup in Shanghai.

GotVMail Communications, a SAGE sponsor, presented Santa Monica High's team with a $1,000 check to pay for travel expenses. SAGE provides hotel and food for the days of the competition, said CSU, Chico business professor Curtis DeBerg, founder of SAGE.

"All country champions fund their own airfare and visa costs to participate in the SAGE World Cup," DeBerg said. "This may sound like a lot to ask, but for a SAGE program to really work in a country or state, it absolutely needs local buy-in from leaders in the business and civic communities, just like interscholastic sports. However, we help them in their fund-raising efforts."

The main sponsors of USA SAGE are Walgreens, Bank of the West, GotVMail, the Harold and Louis Price Foundation, Wells Fargo and the Allstate Foundation. Shelly Taliani, who represents The Allstate Foundation in California, was one of the judges for the California competition. Taliani said, "This program aligns with Allstate's goal to make economic resources and knowledge accessible to the community. By teaching financial literacy and economics to youth, they will be empowered to make informed decisions regarding their financial security throughout their lives."

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Communication Design Students Awarded Prizes in Competition

Tuesday, June 6th, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 6, 2006

Joe Wills
530-898-4143
Barbara Sudick, Department of Communication Design
530-898-5028

Communication Design Students Awarded Prizes in Competition

California State University, Chico students Lucy Redoglia and Daisuke Nozaki have won prizes for publishing excellence in the 2006 Bookbuilders West book design competition.

Bookbuilders West, a nonprofit association founded in San Francisco in 1969, supports book publishing in the 13 states west of the Mississippi. The organization is an educational and professional resource for book publishers throughout the West.

Redoglia was awarded a $1,000 scholarship for her design of "Books Grow with Us." The book celebrates how the seeds of learning sown in childhood and nurtured throughout young lives blossom with maturity. The pages of this book get progressively larger to emphasize this growth. Redoglia interviewed readers from three distinct age groups to determine the changes in their reading habits.

Nozaki is the recipient of the $500 Steve Renick Memorial Award for his project, "Soul." Nozaki's concept for the book uses the strong ethical code of the Japanese bushido or samurai warriors as a metaphor for understanding how the physical book serves to honor and protect an author's idea. Merging digital and print media, the book includes electronically generated Japanese calligraphy that represents the seven virtues: honesty, compassion, courtesy, justice, honor, courage and loyalty.

The books were designed and produced in the Publication Design class taught by Barbara Sudick, associate professor in the Department of Communication Design. The course focuses on the design, typography, production and manufacture of books. The projects were judged in terms of creativity, meeting defined design objectives, and presentation of material. "Both books are exceptional," said Sudick. "These students are outstanding and have very promising careers in publishing ahead of them."

Both books can be seen in the Digital Dialog Show at the Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St., Chico, through June 10. Other projects from Sudick's class can be seen on Adobe's Design and Film School Connection Web site.

Other schools winning awards in this year's Bookbuilders West competition are Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and Seattle Central Community College. The awards will be presented at the 2006 Bookbuilders Awards Ceremony in San Francisco on June 28.

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Italian Studies Hosts Romantic Dinner Show on Thursday

Friday, June 2nd, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Feb. 6, 2006

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260
Eugenio Frongia, Foreign Languages and Literatures
530-898-4479

Italian Studies Hosts Romantic Dinner Show on Thursday

The Italian Studies program at California State University, Chico will host Italia Romantica, Thursday, Feb. 9, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Bell Memorial Union Auditorium on campus.

The dinner features gourmet Italian cuisine and fine wines. A musical program, produced by Mike Bankhead, chair of the Department of Music, will include opera as well as Italian folk tunes. There will also be accordion and mandolin music from Italy, followed by the JazzExpress, the Choral Ensemble and classic pieces from opera, sung by sopranos Ying Yeh and Tamara Alspaugh.

This event is presented in conjunction with the Italian Studies Advisory Council, the Department of Music and the Department of Theatre Arts. A portion of the proceeds will go to the ISAC/Maria S. Haynes Italian Studies Scholarship.

Tickets are available at the University Box Office at the corner of Second and Normal streets, 530-898-6333. Tickets are $40 per person. This event is open to the public.

For more information, contact Eugenio Frongia, director of Italian Studies, at 898-4479.

Speech and Debate Season Canceled Following Drug and Alcohol Use Investigation

Friday, May 26th, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 26, 2006

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Speech and Debate Season Canceled Following Drug and Alcohol Use Investigation

California State University, Chico has canceled its fall 2006 season competing in forensics – often called speech and debate – based on an investigation into drug and alcohol use by some of the team members.

CSU, Chico's intercollegiate forensics program includes a debate team and an individual events (such as persuasive and extemporaneous speaking) team. Each competes in roughly six tournaments during a semester. The program is sponsored by the Department of Communication Arts and Sciences.

The chair of the department, Ruth Guzley, heard an allegation about possible drug and alcohol use among team members in early May and notified the Office of Student Judicial Affairs. The subsequent investigation has uncovered use of marijuana and cocaine by some team members before and after tournaments over the past academic year. In addition, alcohol and illegal drugs were reportedly used by some team members at regular gatherings off-campus.

While Student Judicial Affairs' investigation is continuing, at this time it is believed that approximately one-quarter of the 20 team members used alcohol and drugs during the spring 2006 semester, with several additional team members also using alcohol and drugs in the fall 2005 semester. The majority of other team members reportedly knew about the use or attended the gatherings where drugs and alcohol were present.

After a briefing by Student Judicial Affairs, Phyllis Fernlund, dean of the College of Communication and Education, suspended all competitive activities in forensics and canceled team participation in any tournaments during the fall 2006 term. The decision has the full support of Guzley, forensics director Christopher Howerton, President Paul Zingg, and Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Scott McNall.

"Our message is unequivocal – this behavior will not be tolerated, no matter what type of student organization or activity it is," said McNall. He stressed that the University's response was consistent with actions taken with other student teams and organizations, and reflects the high expectations the University has regarding student conduct.

"Drug and alcohol use by these student team members is absolutely unacceptable, and shows poor judgment on their part as representatives of the University," said Fernlund. "We will not resume our forensics program until we are certain this will not be repeated."

"It saddens me deeply to learn of the terribly misguided choices that these students have made," said Howerton. "This program has a rich history of excellence and I will do everything possible to ensure that this tradition continues as we promote the standards of the University."

CSU, Chico's forensics program has long been recognized for qualifying students for the American Forensics Association National Individual Events Tournament and the Cross Examination Debate Association's National Tournament. Approximately 10 CSU, Chico students over the past decade have reached All-American status in debate or individual events.

Jim Moon, vice president for Student Affairs, said Student Judicial Affairs is currently determining what disciplinary sanctions are appropriate for the students involved. The sanctions, which are confidential, are likely to include disciplinary probation and suspension from school, he said.

Fernlund said the college is instituting a set of new rules for membership on the forensics team and participation in tournaments. Among the changes are stricter limits on who can compete in tournaments. Mandatory interviews and auditions and a higher grade point average will be required before students can participate.

Fernlund said forensics courses will still be offered next fall in the communication arts and sciences department, and students signing up will be able to practice debate and public speaking in class.

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Chico Student Wins First Place in CSU Statewide Research Competition

Friday, May 26th, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 26, 2006

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260
Susan Place, Graduate, International and Interdisciplinary Studies
530-898-6880

Chico Student Wins First Place in CSU Statewide Research Competition

Two students from California State University Chico took top honors at the 20th annual Student Research Competition held May 5 and 6 at CSU, Channel Islands. Robert Abbott, a fall 2005 graduate of Computer Science took first place in the Undergraduate Engineering and Computer Science category and Sarah Horylev, a spring 2006 graduate with an MA in history, was runner-up in the Graduate Behavioral and Social Sciences category.

The CSU research competition is open to all undergraduate or graduate students currently enrolled, as well as alums who received their degrees in spring, summer or fall 2005. The competition showcases the excellent research conducted by CSU undergraduate and graduate students. More than 160 students entered papers this year in 10 different disciplines. Students make oral presentations before juries of experts from a variety of public and private agencies and corporations.

Abbott's entry was titled "Context Driven Spell Checking." He received a $500 prize for his spell check that detects typos and misspellings that result in actual words., "The spell checker is far from perfect, but shows promise," said Abbott. "Much of my effort was directed toward making it run on modern PCs and determining appropriate thresholds for flagging errors so as to maximize the number of mistakes caught, while minimizing the number of correct words incorrectly labeled as mistakes."

Abbott provided these examples: "Untied States" (a typo) should almost definitely be "United States." "Right of Passage" (a mistake) should be "Rite of Passage." When the distinction isn't so clear, his program suggests the choices that are most likely. For example, "red instrument" is perfectly valid nearly everywhere "reed instrument" occurs, but the latter is much more likely.

Abbott said his program has an error rate of 10 percent for false negatives, a rate much lower than the 100-error rate for false negatives of current spell check programs. "Robert has developed an innovative and clever algorithm for detecting wrong-word spelling mistakes," said Professor Tyson Henry, Abbott's research advisor. "The basic idea is to use statistical analysis of the context of a word to determine if it is used correctly. Robert's work is clearly suitable for a master's project, and it is impressive that an undergraduate student could develop such an innovative system." Abbott graduated with a double major in Mathematics and Computer Science. He is currently living in Virginia and working for Cubic Applications, Inc., a defense contractor. He plans to work on a new version of the program with Henry.

Horylev's entry was titled "Contras, Contadora and Human Rights: Ambassador John Negroponte's Role in Destablilizing Nicaragua's Sandinista Government, 1981-1985. Horylev received a $200 prize.

For her research, Horylev used newspaper articles and government documents, including reports written by Congressional delegations to Central America andNegroponte's confirmation hearings for U.S. representative to the United Nations in 2001, ambassador to Iraq in 2004 and director of national intelligence in 2005.

"Most important, though," said Horylev, "I looked at over 400 cables and memos that Negroponte wrote to members of the State Department, CIA and National Security Council during his ambassadorship. These were made available to the public in April 2005. I accessed them on the National Security Archive's Website." Horylev concluded that Negroponte played a very active role in the United States' attempts to destabilize the Sandinista government. Most of the contras were in Honduras, which is strategically located just north of Nicaragua, and the United States used Honduras as a type of base from which it launched the contra war. Negroponte was responsible for securing the Honduran government's continued support for the contra war. Additionally, Horylev said, during Negroponte's ambassadorship, he met regularly with Honduran leaders in order to secure this support and promoted a type of unofficial quid pro quo, in which the United States gave the Honduran government increased military and economic aid in return for allowing the contras to operate out of its country.

"Sarah's research was exceptional," said Horylev's advisor, history professor Steve Lewis. "She is an outstanding student and has already contributed significantly to the research surrounding our involvement in Nicaragua."

Horylev is planning to take a year off to travel in Central America and then she will return to the University to get her teaching credential. Her goal is to teach U.S. history to high school students.

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Business Program Will Provide First International E-Business Training in United States

Wednesday, May 24th, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 24, 2006

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260
Nitish Singh, Marketing
530-898-6090

Business Program Will Provide First International E-Business Training in United States

The Localization Program, headed by Nitish Singh, professor of marketing in the College of Business, California State University, Chico, has been awarded $502,239, from the Business International Education (BIE) Program, United States Department of Education.

The grant will help the College of Business implement the first comprehensive program in international e-business/localization in the United States. Working with strategic business partners, the program will provide education, training and outreach in international e-business to students and businesses.

The BIE grants are meant to promote the ability of U.S. businesses to prosper in an international economy. The CSU, Chico program is one of 25 recipients from an application pool of more than 100 grant applications.

Localization is design and development of multilingual Web sites and applications for different countries. CSU, Chico is one of the first universities in the United States to have a comprehensive 18-unit program related to localization and international e-business.

The grant includes approximately $20,000 per year for two years for student participation, travel and conference participation. Singh will be teaching classes related to Web localization and advanced topics in localization, and business professors Shekhar Misra and Matt Meuter will teach courses related to marketing.

The program is interdisciplinary in nature, with support from the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for language training, Management Information Systems, Regional and Continuing Education for conducting summer workshops, and the Center for Economic Development for outreach to small businesses in regional communities.

The program has already gathered support from businesses, including IBM and Hewlett-Packard, from the Globalization and Localization Association, the Localization Institute and Centers for International Trade Development in Chico, San Francisco and Sacramento.

Singh received his Ph.D. in marketing and international business from Saint Louis University. Most of his undergraduate and postgraduate work was done in India and the U.K. He currently teaches, researches and provides training and consulting in localization and international e-business. In 2005, with co-author Arun Pereira, Singh published "The Culturally Customized Web Site: Customizing Web Sites for the Global Marketplace."

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High School Students Compete in National Entrepreneurship Tournament

Tuesday, May 16th, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 16, 2006

Joe Wills
530-898-4143
Curt DeBerg, Department of Accounting and Management Information Systems
530-898-4824

High School Students Compete in National Entrepreneurship Tournament

More than 100 high school students from six states will be traveling to New York next week to try to become the USA SAGE champion and earn an invitation to represent their country at the SAGE World Cup in Shanghai.

SAGE-Students for the Advancement of Global Entrepreneurship-was founded by California State University, Chico business professor Curt DeBerg and hosts events organized in part by CSU, Chico business students and alumni. "I have an incredible staff of business students, who volunteer for SAGE as part of their commitment and dedication to youth entrepreneurship and social responsibility," DeBerg said. "By serving while they're learning, this is service-learning at its best."

High-school teams are judged on entrepreneurship, community outreach, civic engagement, environmental responsibility, use of college mentors and use of a business advisory board. Following a presentation, judges ask questions of the student presenters.

In partnership with City University of New York Institute for Virtual Enterprise, SAGE will conduct its fourth annual national competition on Friday, May 26, at Kingsborough Community College in Brooklyn.

Last year's national competition was held in San Mateo, Calif. The defending national champion is a team from Northwestern Lehigh High School in New Tripoli, Penn., which came in fourth in the World Cup event behind the winning team from Odessa, Ukraine.

The student entrepreneurship projects can range from running an in-school food cart service in order to reduce lunchtime truancy to finding new markets for handicrafts for an economically impoverished ethnic group. Those projects-by students at the Fremont Business Academy in Oakland and the Central Philippines University Development High School, respectively-are past winners.

For the 2006 national championship, teams from six states, including New York and California, will be making oral and written presentations to a panel of judges. The students will describe their entrepreneurial and social ventures that they started and operated during the past year. One of the entries will be from Chico's Pleasant Valley High School, where students ran a catering business.

National competitions similar to the Brooklyn event are taking place this spring in other countries including China, Russia, Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, Ukraine, Philippines, Tajikistan and Kazakhstan. Each country's winner advances to the SAGE World Cup in Shanghai on August 3-6. DeBerg said he and three CSU, Chico students-Allison Smith, Carol Bayes and Anthony Mellow-will be traveling to Shanghai to help put on the event.

Among the keynote speakers at the May 26 awards banquet will be Gretchen Zucker, executive director of Youth Venture of Arlington, Va. "I see SAGE's mission as a wonderful complement to Youth Venture in that SAGE helps to empower young people by providing them the tools necessary to create civic-minded organizations, clubs or businesses," Zucker said. "The SAGE competition is one way to evaluate the success of the youth-created, youth-led organizations. I hope all of these young, socially minded entrepreneurs become part of the global Youth Venture network."

One of the judges for the national competition is Steve Mariotti, founder and president of the National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship. "I am excited to be taking part in this program," Mariotti said. "At NFTE, we believe developing a business plan is key to improving business, academic and life skills."

One of last year's judges was Charles Toney, human resources specialist for NUMMI. "SAGE can become an essential part of a young person's education, because the program is about applying knowledge to benefit one's community and oneself," Toney said. "Those of us who have mentored or judged SAGE teams look optimistically to the future because we have seen and been heartened by the potential of these youth, as when the 2005 Ohio state champion team talked about importing material from an African country and the Pennsylvania state champion talked about its work for Peruvians."

Among the other judges next week will be Stacie Fieth, director of after school and capstone programs development for Junior Achievement; Amil Husain, global youth coordinator for the United Nations Millennium Campaign; and Jerr Boschee, executive director of The Institute for Social Entrepreneurs.

The main sponsors of USA SAGE are Walgreens, Bank of the West, GotVMail, the Harold and Louis Price Foundation, Wells Fargo and the Allstate Foundation. Shelly Taliani, who represents The Allstate Foundation in California, was one of the judges for the California competition. Taliani said, "This program aligns with Allstate's goal to make economic resources and knowledge accessible to the community. By teaching financial literacy and economics to youth, they will be empowered to make informed decisions regarding their financial security throughout their lives."

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Students Raise Funds for King Monument

Tuesday, May 16th, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 16, 2006

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Students Raise Funds for King Monument

California State University, Chico students spearheaded a fund-raising effort that netted $4,000 for the planned monument in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Chico's Community Park.

The money was raised by proceeds from Chico Diversity Day, held Saturday, May 6, on the CSU, Chico campus, along with other fund-raising by faculty, staff, students and community members.

Approximately 200 people attended the event, which featured a barbecue lunch, music, games, a rendition of King's "I Have a Dream" speech by CSU, Chico staff member Ajamu Lamumba and a welcome by CSU, Chico President Paul Zingg.

CSU, Chico student Malcolm McLemore, chief organizer for Chico Diversity Day, said the funds will help reach the estimated $20,000 needed to build the monument. The Chico Community Coalition, whose members helped with and attended the event, is leading the effort to raise funds for the monument.

McLemore said many campus Greek organizations and other groups sold tickets to Chico Diversity Day or direct donations for the monument, including the Pan African Union, Men of Honor and Women of Excellence.

"We were able to raise $4,000 in two weeks' time – students, faculty and staff really want to see the monument built," said McLemore. "I want us to be involved in more community events that will strengthen diversity."

McLemore thanked local businesses that helped out the event, including Graphic Fox and Dragon Graphics, and volunteers Becky Gall, Robert Williams, Maribal Bravo and Dani Jimenez-Cruz.

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