Archive for the ‘2004 Fall’ Category

Outstanding Professor Named for 2004-2005

Thursday, December 16th, 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 16, 2004
CONTACT: Kathleen McPartland
Tel: 530-898-4260

Outstanding Professor Named for 2004-2005

Professor Sarah Pike, Department of Religious Studies, has been selected as California State University, Chico’s Outstanding Professor for 2004-2005.

Outstanding Professor is the highest honor awarded to faculty at CSU, Chico. The Faculty Recognition and Support Committee recommends the recipient from a pool of high-achieving faculty nominated by colleagues.

Professor Pike received this award for her publications, which include two books, her national reputation in the field of religion in America, women and religion, and new religious movements, as well as for her exemplary teaching and service to the University.

Pike received a PhD from Indiana University in1998. She came to CSU, Chico in 1996, while completing her dissertation. Since then she has taught 14 different courses, including Religion and America’s Ethnic Minorities; Religion and American Society; Violence in American Religious History; Religion, Nature and Environmentalism in America; and Gender, Family and God.

Joel Zimbelman, chair, Department of Religious Studies, said of Pike’s teaching, “Students let us know of their appreciation each semester by the enrollments that we see in her courses. Eight challenging years of course development and hard work have paid off handsomely, and our department majors and general education students are the direct beneficiaries of Sarah’s commitment.”

Pike’s most recent book, released in summer 2004, is “New Age and Neopagan Religions in America” (Columbia University Press). In 2001, she published “Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves: Contemporary Pagans and the Search for Community” (University of California Press). The books, according to Zimbelman, “have established her as the leading scholar in these areas of contemporary religion in America.”

Pike has published six articles in professional journals and contributed substantive entries in five leading encyclopedias over the past four years. She has made nearly two dozen presentations at regional and national conferences, received nine research grants and published numerous book reviews.

Pike was elected in 2002 to chair the Religious Movements Group of the American Academy of Religion. This is a national organization of 10,000 scholars in religion, and it provides the most important and respected venue for the ongoing study of religion in American society.

“Sarah Pike is a splendid colleague-tireless in her work, accessible to students and colleagues, demanding and passionate about her work, and committed to making CSU, Chico a better place academically, intellectually and in its support for and nurturing of students,” said Zimbelman. “She is truly an outstanding professor.”

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California State University, Chico Presents Children in Trauma Conference

Wednesday, December 15th, 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 15, 2004
CONTACT: Joe Wills
Tel: 530-898-4143
Joe Picard, Regional and Continuing Education

530-898-6105

California State University, Chico Presents Children in Trauma onference

California State University, Chico’s Center for Regional and Continuing Education, in partnership with Butte County Family Court Services, presents Children in Trauma 2005, a two-day professional development conference, Jan. 14-15, 2005, at the Masonic Family Center in Chico.

Established in 2003, the annual conference provides professionals an opportunity to learn from colleagues and access education critical to those who work with children who have experienced trauma in their lives.

Friday’s session will feature Dr. John Preston, PsyD, ABPP, who will present Psychopharmacology of Children and Adolescents. An educator and best-selling author (“Handbook of Clinical Psychopharmacology for Therapists”), Preston will address the current science, therapy and outcomes associated with pharmacologic treatments.

Saturday’s session, Child Sexual Exploitation and the Forensic Interview, will be hosted by Terry Thomas. Thomas, special agent for the Crimes Against Children Unit of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, will provide an experienced look at the investigation of sexual abuse and exploitation of children and adolescents. He was awarded the 2002 Florida State Officer of the Year honors for his work helping exploited youth.

Social workers, family therapists, psychologists, mediators, psychiatrists, community leaders, family law attorneys, law enforcement personnel, nurses, physicians, advocates, mental health professionals, child development professionals, school counselors, religious leaders, educators and concerned parents are encouraged to take advantage of this educational opportunity.

Marriage and family therapists, social workers, psychologists, nurses, attorneys, and law enforcement personnel may earn 15 hours of continuing education credit for their participation. One unit of professional service academic credit is available for an additional fee, payable at the conference.

In addition to the featured sessions, exhibitors from nonprofit organizations, private companies and government agencies will share their resources.

The early registration fee (received by Jan. 7) for the two-day conference is $279 (includes support materials, continental breakfast and banquet lunch each day). Single-day and group-rate discounts are also available ($129-$249). To enroll, or for information, please call CSU, Chico Continuing Education at 530-898-6105 or visit the Web site at http://rce.csuchico.edu/inservice.

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Chemistry Department Receives $10,000 for Undergraduate Research

Tuesday, December 14th, 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 14, 2004
CONTACT: Kathleen McPartland
Tel: 530-898-4260
Don Alger, Chemistry
530-898-5259

Chemistry Department Receives $10,000
for Undergraduate Research

Professor David Ball has received word of a $10,000 gift from Roche Palo Alto to the Department of Chemistry at California State University, Chico. Robert Wilhelm, vice president and therapy area head for respiratory diseases at Roche, said that the unrestricted award is to support Professor Ball’s work with undergraduate students in the area of synthetic organic chemistry.

Robert Wilhelm was an undergraduate at CSU, Chico, and David Ball served as his undergraduate research advisor and mentor.

This is the latest in a series of approximately $50,000 in gifts from Roche in support of undergraduate research in synthetic organic chemistry.

The money will be used to provide summer internships of $3,500 for chemistry students. Funding for summer internships comes from a variety of sources. In summer 2004, eight undergraduate students with paid research internships carried out research with six different chemistry faculty.

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Colloquium Will Feature Author Janja Lalich Speaking on Cults and True Believers

Friday, December 10th, 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 12, 2004
CONTACT: Kathleen McPartland
Tel: 530-898-4260
Colloquium Will Feature Author Janja Lalich Speaking on Cults and True Believers

The first Behavioral and Social Sciences Faculty Colloquium at California State University, Chico, will be held Thursday, Oct. 28, at 7 PM in Ayres 106. Professor of Sociology Janja Lalich will be the featured speaker.

Lalich is the author of “Bounded Choice: True Believers and Charismatic Cults” (University of California Press, 2004). Lalich is a researcher, consultant and specialist in the study of cults and psychological manipulation and abuse.

Since the 1990s, the national and local press has interviewed Lalich, most recently in relation to Salt Lake City kidnap-victim Elizabeth Smart, who was returned to her home in March 2003 after nine months in captivity. This past April, Lalich was asked to comment on the Fresno massacre of family members of Marcus Delon Wesson. Lalich has been interviewed on “Meet the Press,” NPR’s “To the Best of Our Knowledge” and, most recently, on BBC Radio’s “Thinking Allowed.”

“Dr. Lalich’s work on and understanding of cults is unique because she realized several years ago that she was an unknowing member of a cult (the Democratic Workers Party) and she was singularly able to free herself from the cult’s attachments,” said Byron Jackson, interim dean of BSS. “Her book, ‘Bounded Choice,’ provides the reader with an insider’s look at cultic groups and makes fascinating comparisons between her own experiences in the Democratic Workers Party, the Heaven’s Gate group and other cults of true believers.”

In addition to illuminating the cult phenomenon in the United States and around the world, Lalich’s bounded choice model can also shed light on the mentality of those true believers who take extreme or violent measures in the name of a cause.

“Given the current state of affairs and all the terrorist activity, it would serve us well, I believe, to strive for an understanding of terrorists as true believers. They are more than just crazed fanatics, and Osama bin Laden is more than just a diabolical leader,” said Lalich. “I am hoping that my work will contribute one more piece to the puzzle of charismatic commitments and the actions of true believers.”

“The idea of a colloquium is the sharing of ideas and the exploration of different ways of thinking,” said Dean Jackson. “Janja Lalich’s work on cults and cult behavior exemplifies the quality of scholarship that we respect and honor in the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences.”

A reception in the BMU lobby will follow the presentation.

The following Web site describes Lalich’s book: http://www.ucpress.edu/books/pages/9497.html.

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August Information Sessions Scheduled for Professional MBA Program in Redding and Chico

Tuesday, December 7th, 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 12, 2004
CONTACT: Joe Wills
Tel: 530-898-4143
Joe Picard, Continuing Education
Tel: 530-898-6105
August Information Sessions Scheduled for
Professional MBA Program in Redding and Chico

California State University, Chico College of Business, in partnership with CSU, Chico Continuing Education and Shasta College, will offer a Professional Master of Business Administration in Redding and Chico with a new cohort starting in August 2005.

First offered at Shasta College in 1995, the program meets the needs of working professionals by providing convenient access to the only MBA in the region accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International.

Courses in the two-year, 30-unit MBA program will be taught by experienced Chico faculty and scheduled in an accelerated Saturday format. Classes will be delivered through live on-site lectures and two-way video teleconferencing originating from Shasta College and the Chico campus. Participants can elect to attend courses in Redding or Chico.
The Professional MBA curriculum focuses on the real-world application of theory and best business practices to give candidates the knowledge and skills required to proactively manage both small and large enterprises.
Individuals who are interested in the Professional MBA program are encouraged to attend one of the upcoming information sessions in either Redding or Chico. Faculty will be on hand to discuss the program, answer questions and assist in the admissions process.
The next Redding information session will be held Tuesday, August 10, 6-7:30 p.m., on the Shasta College campus, Board Room, Administration Building 100, Room 154.

The next Chico information session will be held Wednesday, August 11, 6-7:30 p.m., at the CSU, Chico Continuing Education building on campus.
Interested individuals who want to attend an information session are asked to RSVP by calling CSU, Chico Continuing Education at 530-898-6105 or by sending an e-mail to rce@csuchico.edu with their contact information. For more information please visit http://rce.csuchico.edu/mba.

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Holiday Giving Tree Program Starts Monday

Wednesday, November 24th, 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 24, 2004
CONTACT: Joe Wills
Tel: 530-898-4143
Rebecca Berner, Campus Alcohol & Drug Education Center
(530) 898-6450

Holiday Giving Tree Program Starts Monday

Festive, holiday trees will go up across the California State University, Chico campus on Monday, Nov. 29, as part of the Campus Alcohol and Drug Education Center’s annual Giving Tree program.

Now in its 12th year, the Giving Tree program encourages CSU, Chico faculty, students and staff to spread the holiday spirit by donating gifts for children in need in the local community.

Participants visit one of six Giving Trees at various locations across campus, select a tree tag with a child’s name on it, purchase a gift for the child and return the unwrapped gift to the Bell Memorial Union Information Center by Dec. 15. The gifts will be distributed to children served by three Chico non-profit agencies: Touchstone Perinatal Program, Northern Valley Catholic Social Service Teen Parent Program and Family Solutions.

Last year, the program collected more than 1,500 gifts donated by the campus community, including new clothing, toys, educational games and books.

Giving Trees will be located in the BMU, Whitney Hall, University Village, Mechoopda Lounge, Konkow Embassy and Lassen and Shasta Residence Halls. To launch the project, free apple cider and cookies will be served at the BMU location on Nov. 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Giving Tree project is sponsored by Associated Students Activity Fee Council and the Campus Alcohol and Drug Education Center. CADEC works to help CSU, Chico students succeed in college and beyond by encouraging them to make responsible, healthy choices with regards to alcohol, tobacco and other drugs.

Additional information on the Giving Tree program is available by contacting CADEC at 898-6450.

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Tourism Major Receives National Tourism Foundation Scholarship

Monday, November 22nd, 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 22, 2004
CONTACT: Kathleen McPartland
Tel: 530-898-4260

Tourism Major Receives National Tourism
Foundation Scholarship

Heather Foreman, a senior at California State University, Chico, is the recipient of the National Tourism Foundation 2004 California $2,000 Scholarship. Foreman is majoring in special event and tourism management.

In addition to the scholarship money, Foreman received an invitation to the National Tour Association’s Annual Convention in Toronto, Nov. 12-16. The convention was attended by more than 3,000 industry professionals, as well as the award recipients. Recipients participated in roundtable discussions with NTA members and got a firsthand look at business negotiations in progress.

To be eligible for the California Scholarship, applicants must be full-time students and residents of California. They must have a 3.0 GPA or better, be entering the junior or senior year and have a degree emphasis in a travel-and-tourism-related field.

Foreman planned and executed large events for Bonfante Gardens Golf & Games and Hecker Pass: A Family Adventure. She is a member of the Golden Key International Honor Society.

“I decided to pursue a degree in travel and tourism while working as an events coordinator for a small theme park and family entertainment center. I enjoyed meeting new people and planning out events. I am a very detailed individual, and this industry presented a challenge for me. I am interested in the tourism field because most major events rely on tourism. I also enjoy working in different cities and being exposed to different cultures,” said Foreman.

The National Tourism Foundation is a nonprofit organization founded by the National Tour Association, an organization of nearly 4,000 travel professionals. Since 1982, the Foundation has awarded more than $1.5 million to travel and tourism students in the form of grants, scholarships and awards.

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Community Invited to Session on Renewable Energy Options

Thursday, November 18th, 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 18, 2004
CONTACT: Kathleen McPartland
Tel: 530-898-4260
Mark Stemen, Environmental Studies
530-898-5428

Community Invited to Session on Renewable Energy Options

On Thursday, Dec.9, at an information and work session called a charrette, California State University, Chico students in an environmental sociology class will share the results of their award-winning work with community members on projects to increase the application of alternative energy. North State Renewable Energy will host the charrette at 6 PM in Conference Room 1 at the Chico City Council Chambers, located at the corner of 4th and Main streets.

In September, the Environmental Protection Agency selected California State University, Chico students from Professor Laurie Wermuth’s Environmental Sociology class for a People, Prosperity and the Planet Award. The 66 award recipients were chosen from applicants nationwide.

Over the course of the semester, the students have collaborated with community members on projects to increase the application of alternative energy. The have worked on a project to install solar panels at Pleasant Valley High School, researched solar water heaters for Bidwell Apartments and documented the energy efficiency of homes in the Doe Mill Neighborhood.

During the charrette, the students will present what they have learned, and members of North State Renewable Energy will display facts and figures on other local alternative energy projects. The information session is designed to help members of the community envision ways to incorporate alternative energy into their home or business.

Admission is free and refreshments will be served. For more information, call Mark Stemen at 530-898-5428 or e-mail him at mstemen@csuchico.edu.

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Advanced Equipment Helps Chemistry Students Explore Light

Wednesday, November 17th, 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 17, 2004
CONTACT: Kathleen McPartland
Tel: 530-898-4260
Jim Postma, Chemistry
530-898-5159

Advanced Equipment Helps Chemistry Students Explore Light

The Department of Chemistry in the College of Natural Sciences has received a $14,000 donation from a local business that allows the purchase of a new, full-featured Fourier-Transform InfraRed spectrophotometer that will be used by faculty and students for classroom projects and research.

Brian Pierce, CEO of Advanced Light Technologies, made the donation as part of a seven-year relationship between his company and the University. In the past, Advanced Light has funded research projects that involve students and faculty from the departments of biological sciences, chemistry and physics to explore the uses of various forms of light, including infrared light, to accomplish a variety of processes, including killing bugs, disinfecting food items and processing agricultural products.

Since 1997, Advanced Light projects have involved 12 students in the areas of chemistry, biology, physics, mechatronic engineering, microbiology and nutrition science. These students have been advised and mentored by chemistry professors Larry Kirk, Randy Miller and Jim Postma, physics professor Chuck Chau, and biology professors Larry Hanne and Sam Beattie, along with college staff and other faculty.

The spectrophotometer will allow science students and Advanced Light to explore the interactions of light with matter. Chemists will use the spectrophotometer to probe the individual bonds that make up a molecule. This allows them to distinguish molecules from one another by their unique pattern of light absorption. These “optical fingerprints” allow chemists to uniquely identify molecules, such as legal and illegal drugs, or help elucidate the structure of a newly synthesized molecule, such as a new pharmaceutical.

Advanced Light is interested in cases where the bug absorbs light energy and the plant does not, such as a red bug sitting on a green plant. (In this case, the bug is red because it reflects red light and absorbs green, whereas the leaf is green because it absorbs the red and reflects the green light.) Besides agriculture, there are potential applications in polymer sterilization, including those used in medical contexts. Advanced Light has ideas for applications in medical treatments and bio-terrorism responses.

Jim Postma, professor of chemistry, said, “This donation and ongoing projects provide needed revenue at a time when state resources are diminishing. It provides interesting projects to challenge the creativity of faculty and students, and along with such projects comes enthusiastic support from those outside the University, including Sunsweet Foods, Blue Diamond and several other companies in addition to Advanced.”

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Animation Project Wins Best of Show in CSU Media Arts Festival

Wednesday, November 17th, 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 17, 2004
CONTACT: Kathleen McPartland
Tel: 530-898-4260
Rick Vertolli, Instructional Media Center
and Computer Science
530-898-4421

Animation Project Wins Best of Show in
CSU Media Arts Festival

The CSU Media Arts Festival 2004 winner was an entry by California State University, Chico students. This is the fourth time students from CSU, Chico have won “Best of Show” in this systemwide competition. In addition, Chico has won in the category “Best Animation” in an unprecedented eight out of the 13 years since the competition began.

Best of show is selected from eight media categories, including Narrative, Music Videos, Experimental, Documentary and Animation. This year’s festival, held at the CSU, Channel Islands campus, included 220 entries from 18 campuses. Chico’s animation project, “Potty Break,” won both “Best Animation” and tied for “Best of Show.”

Student director Todd Jansen, assisted by animation students Jacob Palmer and Sean Ridgway, received top honors and a $1,000 prize. The Applied Computer Graphics program, part of the College of Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Management, received $500. A second Chico project, by Kentaro Nagase, was awarded second place in the animation category.

Joanne Bartok, director of the CSU Media Arts Festival, said the animation coming out of CSU, Chico is some of the best work she and others have seen in California. “I bring in animators from some of the biggest companies in the world (Pixar, Industrial Light Magic and Digital Domain), and they are beginning to notice that Chico is a powerhouse for animation, in spite of being isolated in Northern California.”

Rick Vertolli, instructor for the animation class in which these pieces were produced, said there are many stages involved in creating an animation, and quite often it takes over a year from inception to finished projects. Vertolli, an animation supervisor in the Instructional Media Center and instructor in the Applied Computer Graphics program, believes it all starts with a good story.

“Computer Animation is very complicated, and animators must acquire a variety of skills. They are designers, sculptors, camera and lighting operators, technicians and editors, but most important they need a good idea and story to tell,” said Vertolli.

Bartok said of Vertolli, “Rick is an amazing teacher. He’s like a rock star to his students. I can call the graphic design center at Chico any time day or night and Rick, more often than not, is there. He is one of those people who puts in an incredible amount of time on campus because he loves being there.”

Vertolli came to CSU, Chico 20 years ago from Kent State University with a fine arts degree to study computer graphics with Professor Grace Hertlein. “Very few people were creating computer graphics at this time. So we took the information from traditional animators and applied those principles to computer animation,” said Vertolli.

With help from industrial advisors, Vertolli and others have developed a method for producing computer animation. It simplifies what is a very complicated process.

“First, we develop a ‘treatment,’ a summary of the main idea of the story,” said Vertolli. “Then we draw storyboards that serve as blueprints for the action and dialogue. Next we build an animatic, an animated cartoon strip that combines vocals and still imagery. It is used to flesh out the timing of each shot. Then we design characters that have strong audience appeal. It is only at this point that we begin using computers to model our characters and get them to move and act out a scene.”

Ken Derucher, dean of the College of Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Management, said, “One of the reasons we got into computer graphics is the quality, dedication and ability of Rick Vertolli and other faculty who teach in this area-it is second to none. The students’ dedication and willingness to learn yield these winning results, year after year.”

The Applied Computer Graphics program has begun its second year as an approved major and supports faculty members Rick Vertolli, Clark Steinbeck, Frank Periea and John Pozzi.

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