Archive for the ‘2001 Fall’ Category

Museum of Anthropology Presents Taming the Wild Exhibition

Tuesday, December 18th, 2001

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 18, 2001

Jennifer Proctor, Public Affairs Intern
530-898-4143

Museum of Anthropology Presents Taming the Wild Exhibition

California State University, Chico’s Museum of Anthropology opened its “Taming the Wild: Human and Animal Relations” exhibition on Tuesday, Dec. 11.

“The exhibit symbolizes the interrelationships between humans and animals, specifically the domestication, training, taming and religious significance humans have put on animals, focusing on non-Western cultures,” said Stacy Schaefer, professor of anthropology.

Students from an upper-division anthropology course designed their own displays for the exhibit.

The museum, located on the third floor of Langdon Hall on Warner and First Streets, offers exhibits free to the public Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The exhibit will be closed Dec. 22-Jan. 7, then will resume the same operating hours Jan. 8 until May 17.

For more information, please contact Stacy Schaefer at 530-898-5861.

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Agriculture Dean Named to State Board of Food and Agriculture

Monday, December 17th, 2001

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 17, 2001

Loriann Maxwell
530-898-4263

Agriculture Dean Named to State Board of Food and Agriculture

Charles Crabb, dean of the College of Agriculture at California State University, Chico, has been appointed by Governor Gray Davis as a member of the California State Board of Food and Agriculture.

Before joining CSU, Chico in 1999, Crabb served four years as the associate vice president for academic resources at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. Prior to that, he was a professor in the crop science department at Cal Poly for 11 years.

From 1995 to1999, he served as director of the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, South Central Region, and director of the University of California’s Kearney Agriculture Center.

Crabb received his bachelor’s degree and Ph.D. in ecology from the University of California, Davis, and his master’s degree from Bowling Green State University. He is an accomplished author and expert in the field of crop damage and pest management.

The Board of Food and Agriculture’s primary function is to advise the governor and director on matters concerning the state’s agriculture industry, and how the department can best serve those needs. Senate confirmation is not required for these appointments, and members of the Board do not receive salaries. Members are appointed to four-year terms.

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Grant to Address Health Hazards of Overweight Children

Thursday, December 13th, 2001

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 13, 2001

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Grant to Address Health Hazards of Overweight Children

California State University, Chico, in partnership with a number of public and private entities, has received a $590,000 grant to oversee a program in Butte County for the prevention of unhealthy weight gain in children and the treatment of overweight children. The program is titled OPT (Overweight, Prevention, and Treatment) for Fit Kids.

Data collected over the past five years shows an increase in the number of county children who are in the 95th percentile in weight for their age and height, reflecting a widespread national trend. Overweight children experience health problems that can extend into adulthood.

The Children and Families Commission of Butte County awarded the grant to the university, which has also been awarded partial matching funds from the California Nutrition Network. The program will have more than $700,000 to aid county children for the three-year term of the grant.

The commission is directed to award funds from state tobacco tax money to directly benefit the health of young children.

Faye Johnson, professor in the Nutrition and Food Sciences Program, and Cindy Wolff, coordinator of the program, will oversee the grant implementation. Wolff also wrote and was awarded an initial $40,000 planning grant for the effort to aid overweight children.

Among the partners in the grant are Enloe Medical Center, Butte County Department of Public Health, Butte County WIC, Butte County UC Cooperative Extension, the CA 5 A Day program, and Butte County Head Start. In addition, Michele Brackett, health educator for Butte County’s Department of Public Health, has been assigned part-time to the project.

Wolff said diabetes, high blood pressure and elevated blood cholesterol, which are often directly correlated to being overweight, are the chief health concerns. She said very heavy children can exhibit early signs of diabetes, which can lead to cardiovascular and other health problems. Being overweight as a child is a strong predictor of being overweight as an adult, Wolff said.

Diet is one culprit in the increase in overweight children. “More and more families decide it’s easier to eat out, and choose high calorie fast food,” said Johnson. “Also, with more parents working, children are increasingly responsible for preparing their own meals, resulting in more high-calorie, high-fat meals,” she added.

Just as important, however, is the lack of physical activity among many children. Johnson said a decreasing number of children pass the fitness exams given in elementary schools. She said fewer children walking to school, and increasing hours of children playing video games and watching TV, are contributing factors to the change.

The OPT for Fit Kids program has three components: medical nutrition therapy services for overweight children and their families, an educational awareness campaign for the public and nutrition education in schools. Medical nutrition therapy services will be extended after overweight children have been identified and referred by health care practitioners. The families then have the opportunity to speak with a dietitian, attend workshops and obtain related services.

OPT program services are free for children ages 5 and under and for low income children ages 6 and up. Services are available on a sliding scale for all others. The awareness campaign and nutrition education components of the program will educate county residents about childhood health risks associated with being overweight, and about strategies for promoting healthy eating and activity practices.

To help introduce the program, a Pediatric Overweight Symposium was held Dec. 12, at the Enloe Conference Center and was attended by about 80 pediatric health professionals. Dr. Dennis Styne, pediatric endocrinologist from UC Davis, was keynote speaker, presenting information on “Childhood Obesity and its Complications: Facing a New Epidemic.” Dr. Mark Lundberg, Health Officer, Butte County Department of Public Health, spoke on “Pediatric Overweight Trends in Butte County,” and Professor Wolff spoke on “Using BMI to Assess Pediatric Patients and Local Services Available for Pediatrics in Butte County.”

For more information about the program, contact Cindy Wolff at 530-898-6164, Michele Brackett at 530-891-2861 or Faye Johnson at 530-898-6767.

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New Building Project Celebrated With Topping-Out Ceremony

Wednesday, December 12th, 2001

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 12, 2001

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

New Building Project Celebrated With Topping-Out Ceremony

Progress on the new Yolo Hall classroom building at California State University, Chico will be celebrated with a ceremony Wednesday, Dec. 19, at 11:30 a.m.

After remarks by university and construction company officials, a live tree will be hoisted to the top of the structural framework of the building. The tree will later be planted as part of the permanent landscaping surrounding Yolo Hall, which is located just west of Shurmer Gymnasium.

The ceremony will take place in Shurmer Gym and near the construction site, weather permitting. Afterward, the university will host a barbecue lunch for staff and faculty who will be relocating to the building.

Known as the Physical Education II building, or PE II, during its design phase, Yolo Hall will be home to classroom and laboratory facilities as well as faculty and staff offices for the departments of physical education, exercise science, and recreation and parks management. The two-story building will be 70,626 square feet.

John F. Otto Inc. of Sacramento received the $12 million contract to build Yolo Hall. The project began in July and is scheduled for completion December 2002. The building was designed by Lionakis-Beaumont Design Group of Sacramento.

Among those planning to speak at the ceremony are CSU, Chico President Manuel Esteban, John F. Otto Inc. President Carl Otto, CSU, Chico Vice President for Business and Finance Dennis Graham and Professor Dick Trimmer, chair of physical education and exercise science.

John F. Otto Inc. is a general building contractor in its 54th year of business. With an annual volume of construction projects in excess of $68 million, it is considered one of the premier building firms in Northern California. Lionakis-Beaumont Design Group was founded by George Sellon, California’s first State Architect. LBDG is the largest architectural firm in Sacramento, serving a wide variety of clients in Northern and Central California.

Greg Francis, CSU, Chico director of facilities planning, said topping-out ceremonies are a tradition for building projects such as Yolo Hall. A steel beam painted and signed by dignitaries is often installed at such an event, he said. Francis said the use of the tree was especially meaningful since it will be planted at the site at a later date.

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University Departments Donate to Needy Families

Thursday, December 6th, 2001

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 6, 2001

Jennifer Proctor, Public Affairs Intern
530-898-4143

University Departments Donate to Needy Families

Eighty-eight faculty and staff departments on the California State University, Chico campus have chosen to adopt families from Butte County as a part of the University Needy Children’s Program.

Social workers from the Children’s Services Division of Butte County Social Services choose families for the university and provide a wish list for the children. Many of the items on the list include educational toys and warm clothing. In addition to the donations made from the faculty departments, each family will be given a food certificate for approximately $50.

University departments will deliver their items to the University Farm on Wednesday, Dec. 12, at 6 p.m. The social workers will be there to gather the donations and deliver them to the families.

The Needy Children’s program started at the university in the1980s. Staff Council adopted the project in 1990. Financial Aid staff member Yvonne Lydon has chaired or co-chaired the program since 1994. Lydon said, “Social workers for the families share stories about the excitement of the children when they receive the gifts. Many departments often get thank-you notes back from the children.

“Every year the university is eager to get their families. Pulling together at this time of year gets you in the spirit of the season,” said Lydon.

Last year over $40,000 was donated in gifts and food certificates.

For more information, please contact Yvonne Lydon at 530-898-4222.

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CSU, Chico Exceeds Goal in Campaign to Raise Scholarship Funds

Monday, December 3rd, 2001

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 3, 2001

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

CSU, Chico Exceeds Goal in Campaign to Raise Scholarship Funds

California State University, Chico has successfully concluded its first long-term fund-raising campaign, a three-year effort to raise money for scholarships to benefit CSU, Chico students.

While CSU, Chico set a $10 million goal for the campaign, President Manuel A. Esteban has announced that the university has raised $16,713,496 for scholarships.

The money raised will go toward scholarships for students who have a financial need as well as students who merit aid because of outstanding academic achievements and talents.

“Although we still have additional need, and thus we cannot stop fundraising, we can declare with great pride that we have reached our goal for this campaign,” Esteban said.

Ed Masterson, associate vice president for university advancement, said hundreds of individuals contributed to the campaign. Contributions from donors were made in the form of testamentary bequests, irrevocable trusts, and cash, he said.

“This is the first major campaign we’ve undertaken. We surpassed our goal, and it is a tremendous credit to the many alumni, parents, friends, foundations and businesses who contributed to the campaign,” said Masterson.

Esteban and Steve Nettleton, owner of the Chico Heat and a long-time financial supporter of the university, were co-chairs of the campaign. The campaign title was “Fulfilling the Promise,” referring to the goal of assisting as many students as possible in fulfilling their dreams of a quality college education.

Newly raised funds will support a variety of need-based and merit-based individual scholarships. In addition, the campaign will benefit the President’s Scholars Awards, an annual spring event where roughly 200 high school students take a test to compete for scholarships. In 2001, 10 high-scoring students received $12,000 each for four years of study, and another 12 received $1,000 each.

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Scholars’ Program Helps Middle Schoolers Bridge the Digital Divide with “eBus”

Thursday, November 29th, 2001

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 29, 2001

Allan Bee, Educational Talent Search
530-898-4429
Joe Wills, Public Affairs
530-898-4143

Scholars’ Program Helps Middle Schoolers Bridge the Digital Divide with “eBus”

California State University, Chico’s Educational Talent Search Program hosted its annual 7th/8th Grade Scholars’ Program on Nov. 27, 2001, next to the campus’s Bell Memorial Union. Attending the program were 98 students and eight chaperones from the following schools: Chico Junior High School, Central Middle School (Oroville), Egling Middle School (Colusa), Hamilton Elementary School (Hamilton City), Anna McKenney Intermediate School (Marysville) and C.K. Price Middle School (Orland).

Educational Talent Search (ETS) is a federally funded program that seeks to prepare and motivate 800 students in grades 6-12 for success in postsecondary education. ETS works in 22 schools in six northern counties, including Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Sutter, Tehama and Yuba counties. ETS students receive help with postsecondary exploration, goal setting, academic assistance, academic tutoring, financial aid and scholarship assistance along with academic tutoring from college-aged mentors.

The purpose of the Scholars’ Program is to allow students as young as the 7th grade to begin exploring their college options. Aside from tours of the campus, cultural activities and visits to the campus’s Roth Planetarium, students participated in hands-on engineering activities.

One activity had students working together to learn about principles of physics and engineering as they constructed “sail cars.” The cars were set in front of a fan, and those that traveled the farthest were awarded prizes and certificates.

Students entered the world of technology on the “eBus,” a 40-foot, fully equipped mobile computer lab with 16 computer workstations. The “eBus,” sponsored by the Community College Foundation, travels throughout the state and brings technology access to underserved communities, free of charge. A portable satellite is used to obtain a two-way wireless connection to the Internet. Aboard the “eBus,” instructors can provide training in computer basics and literacy, assist with computerized job search and employment development skills, and support after-school programs.

“It’s always satisfying to bring students to campus and give them exposure to the facilities and programs we take for granted,” said Allan Bee, ETS director. “Just being in the BMU is an eye opener for many of our students. It’s never too soon to start motivating them toward higher education.”

Computers influence students’ lives now more than ever. Regrettably, rural and low-income students who attend schools with limited finances often do not have access to cutting-edge computer technology. The collaboration between ETS and the Foundation is designed to help students gain such exposure and help them understand the importance of education beyond high school.

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Student Leadership Reception Hosted at CSU, Chico

Tuesday, November 27th, 2001

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 27, 2001

Jennifer Proctor, Public Affairs Intern
530-898-4260

Student Leadership Reception Hosted at CSU, Chico

The President’s Student Leadership Reception will be held Wednesday, Dec. 5, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. in the Bell Memorial Union Auditorium on the California State University, Chico campus.

This annual event is held to recognize and honor the student leaders of the campus organizations and to thank them for their dedication in serving their organizations. Approximately 280 student leaders have been invited, and roughly the same number of staff, many of whom are professors or advisers of the students.

Carol Berg, executive assistant to the president, said, “Developing leaders among our students is a major emphasis for the university.” Involving students in leadership opportunities on campus is one way the university helps students develop responsibility.

For more information, contact Crystal Williams at 530-898-6131.

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Education Policy Analyst Gerald Bracey Presents Talks for Educators

Tuesday, November 20th, 2001

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 20, 2001

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260
Judith Kerrins, Education
530-898-4849
Kay Cushing, Psychology
530-898-5281

Education Policy Analyst Gerald Bracey Presents Talks for Educators

Gerald Bracey, a nationally known education policy analyst, researcher and writer, will be at California State University, Chico Wednesday, Nov. 28 through Friday, Nov. 30 as part of the Visiting Presidential Scholar series.

A full schedule of activities of special interest to educators is planned for the three days. The keynote address, a variety of sessions, and a question-and-answer series are all free and open to the public. See below for a detailed schedule. A dinner with Bracey, presented by the local educators’ honor society Phi Delta Kappa on Thursday, Nov. 29, costs $16 and requires reservations.

Bracey is known for his “Bracey Reports,” which began with the 1991 article “Why Can’t They Be Like We Were?” That article drew the attention of The New York Times, Washington Post, USA Today and Education Week, and the wrath of the White House.

The first report, which became known as the “Bracey Report,” has been followed annually with updated data analysis to debunk myths about American public education. You can read the current report at www.america-tomorrow.com/bracey/EDDRA/bracey11/htm.

Bracey will deliver his keynote address, “The Condition of American Public Education: Why the Critics Are Wrong,” on Wednesday, Nov. 28, 4-5:30 p.m., in Laxson Auditorium. Following the talk, Bracey will answer questions and autograph copies of his books.

Bracey will address the following questions, among others, in his keynote address and in other discussions throughout the three days: Are AmericaÕs public school students really as far behind academically as students in other countries? Does money make a difference in the quality of education a child receives in a public school? Will the new California high school exit exam really improve student achievement? Does smaller class size result in improved student learning or just make teaching less exhausting for teachers?

Schedule of events

Wednesday, Nov. 28
2-3:15 p.m. BMU 210
The Role of Higher Education Faculty in Student Learning and School Improvement
4-5:30 p.m.
The Condition of American Public Education: Why the Critics Are Wrong

Thursday, Nov. 29
8-11 a.m. Kendall 207-209
Myths and Questions about Public Education in America
8-9 a.m. The Myth that Money Doesn’t Matter
9-10 a.m. Do High Stakes Exit Exams Improve Student Learning?
10-11 a.m. Data vs. Spin: The Accuracy of Public Perceptions about America’s Schools

6 p.m. Casa Lupe on Park Avenue
Dinner with Bracey
Phi Delta Kappa is sponsoring this dinner for members and non-members. For information and reservations, call Gary Estep at 530-345-6701 or the Department of Education at 530-898-6421.

Friday, Nov. 30
10:30-noon BMU Room 210
The Use and Misuse of Tests and Statistics

Gerald Bracey’s visit is sponsored by the CSU, Chico Office of the President, Visiting Scholars program; College of Communication and Education; Department of Psychology; Chico Unified School District; Phi Delta Kappa; North State Professional Development Consortium; the History Social Science project; and PSY CHI National Honor Society.

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Trip to Central Europe Sponsored by CSU, Chico

Thursday, November 15th, 2001

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 15, 2001

Jennifer Proctor, Public Affairs Intern
530-898-4143

Trip to Central Europe Sponsored by CSU, Chico

California State University, Chico is sponsoring a group tour for 20 people to Central Europe, including Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary and Austria, from June 7-21. The 13-night tour will focus on the history, culture and natural history of Warsaw, Krakow, Zakopane, Prague, Brno, Vienna and Budapest.

Leading the tour will be biology professor Roger Lederer and English professor Carol Burr. Lederer is a naturalist with special expertise in ornithology, former dean of the College of Natural Sciences, and presently the director of the Bidwell Environmental Institute and Endowed Professor of Environmental Literacy. Burr is the director of the Center for Multicultural and Gender Studies.

Lederer and Burr are experienced world travelers and led a group trip to Peru in spring 2001. Lederer said, “I have been to Austria, my wife [Burr] has been to Poland and both of us have traveled in the Czech Republic. We are looking forward to going back to those places where we have been and seeing new areas and have no reservations about any aspect of the travel there.”

Among the planned highlights of the trip are visits to the Historical Museum of Warsaw, the Wavel Castle in Krakow where Oskar Schindler employed Jewish workers during the Nazi occupation, and the Basilica of St. George in Prague.

Lederer said, “This is a trip to politically and economically stable countries in central Europe. Across Europe, folks are welcoming to tourists and are accustomed to a variety of visitors from all over the world.” Last year nearly 13 million Americans visited Europe, Lederer added.

The tour company for the trip is Passages, a Bay Area travel firm. “The added safety of going with an experienced tour company will make this a safe and enjoyable trip,” Lederer said.

There is still room on the tour, and interested parties are encouraged to contact Lederer at 530-898-6317 or Burr at 530-898-4131 for more information about the trip.

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