Archive for the ‘2000 Fall’ Category

College of Business Accreditation Re-affirmed

Friday, December 8th, 2000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 8, 2000

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

College of Business Accreditation Re-affirmed

California State University, Chico’s College of Business has had the accreditation of its undergraduate and master’s programs re-affirmed by the country’s leading accrediting body for business colleges.

The college received word Dec. 5 of the re-affirmation from the AACSB Ð The International Association for Management Education. Re-affirmation is the term used to periodically continue accreditation at an already-accredited institution. The College of Business has been accredited since 1972.

In a letter to College of Business Dean Heikki Rinne, AACSB Chair of the Board Larry Penley commended the college in three areas: responsiveness to the accrediting process, leadership from Rinne and former Interim Dean Marc Siegall, and progress by the college faculty in increasing scholarship and academic excellence.

“Our faculty won this for the college,” said Rinne. “They more than doubled their output of publications and were extremely responsive to the accrediting team. This re-affirmation is the best possible outcome for the college.”

In 1998 the college was placed in a status called continuing review by the AACSB, requiring the college to complete annual reports to the AACSB and show continuous improvement in areas such as curriculum improvement and faculty scholarship. The college will next be reviewed by the AACSB in 2006.

The AACSB, based in St. Louis, accredits business schools around the world. Of the approximately 1,200 programs in the U.S., only about 390 have earned accreditation. Even fewer have both their undergraduate and graduate programs accredited, as CSU, Chico does.

Rinne said the college’s challenge for the future is dealing with tremendous enrollment growth. The number of business majors this year is 2,235, a 15-percent increase over last year. Rinne said the college will be seeking increased funding for student programs and additional faculty.

In recent years, the college has established strong corporate partnerships with Cisco Systems, SAP America and other corporations. In 1999, Cisco Systems funded an advanced networking lab for the college. This year the college was named SAP’s first University Competency Center, and in 1998 won SAP’s largest University Alliance Research Award for its work integrating SAP’s enterprise-wide software into business classes.

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Sue Anderson Named New Director of Alumni and Parent Relations

Friday, December 8th, 2000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 8, 2000

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260

Sue Anderson Named New Director of Alumni and Parent Relations

Sue Anderson has been named the director of Alumni and Parent Relations for California State University, Chico. Anderson has been acting director since the retirement of Director Jack Fox in August 2000.

Anderson was assistant director of Alumni and Parent Relations from October 1998 until now. Before that, she worked as marketing director for Chamber’s Cable.

The Office of Alumni and Parent Relations oversees a dues-paying alumni membership, is responsible for Commencement and Homecoming and the Distinguished Alumni program, and supports current students through scholarship activity, the Model UN program and the Associated Students.

As assistant director, Anderson worked with Fox as he launched the dues-paying membership drive. She was the hands-on manager for Commencement and Homecoming, and involved in almost all aspects of the office. “I know what I’m getting into, ” said Anderson, “and I look forward to the challenge. Jack put our alumni program back on the map, and there is so much to do to continue that work.”

Anderson plans to work on revitalizing the parent board and getting parents more involved. She will continue to work on expanding the benefits for dues paying alumni, creating more travel opportunities for alumni, and, down the line, developing an on-campus summer program for alumni and their families.

Paul Moore, vice president for Advancement and Student Affairs, said, “I am extremely pleased that Sue has agreed to join us as Director of Alumni and Parent Relations. She brings to us wonderful and relevant experience. Alumni and parents are important allies as we work to strengthen the university. Sue is the right person at the right time to organize these important constituencies.”

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DeWayne Named Director of University Public Events

Friday, December 8th, 2000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 8, 2000

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260
Daran Marx Finney
University Public Events
530-898-5917

DeWayne Named Director of University Public Events

Dan DeWayne has been named Director of University Public Events/Chico Performances, effective January 1, 2000. DeWayne, who currently serves as associate director, will assume the position upon the retirement of Patrick W. Kopp.

DeWayne has been with University Public Events (UPE) for three years. As associate director, he worked jointly with Kopp to coordinate Chico Performances, the presenting arm of UPE, and to direct the day-to-day activities of the department.

As director, DeWayne will represent University Public Events to the campus community and the community at large. “I am looking forward to directing a department that has been hugely successful. Pat Kopp has worked for 36 years to advance the arts on campus and in our community, and I’m honored to continue in his footsteps,” said DeWayne.

Directing UPE encompasses a broad range of responsibilities. DeWayne will oversee the staff and budget for the department, guide facility reservations and box office operations, and pursue funding, grants, and development. He will book and negotiate with artists and artist residencies and oversee marketing. He is responsible for creating and maintaining a membership program, a community advisory committee, a student advisory committee and a volunteer group.

DeWayne has been involved in performance art and business for 20 years. He came to UPE with a background in event and media coordination, community outreach and financial management. He and his wife, Christine Myers, co-founded Maple Creek Presents. The company presents the California World Music Festival each summer in Grass Valley.

From 1982 to 1991 DeWayne was president and co-founder of the Strawberry Music Festival, one of the most recognized music festivals in the United States. He also created several offshoot businessesÑ Strawberry Records, Strawberry Preserves Nature Store, and the Camp Mather General Store. In addition, he and Christine produced Chico’s own Shakespeare in the Park for five years.

DeWayne sees the presentation of music and theatre as an important cultural and economic force in the community. He has participated on the Chico Arts Task Force and served on the Chamber of Commerce Tourism committee.

In 1998, DeWayne and wife were awarded the Mayor’s Award for Advancement of the Arts, and in October 2000 he was awarded an Annie for Lifetime Achievement in Music.

DeWayne sees his future at UPE as a long-term commitment. “I feel very fortunate to be a part of CSU, Chico and our Northern California Arts community. My intent is to work closely with the wonderful staff of UPE to increase awareness of the important role live performance plays in all of our lives.”

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University Needy Children’s Program Wraps Up Christmas Giving

Thursday, December 7th, 2000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 7, 2000

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260

University Needy Children’s Program Wraps Up Christmas Giving

Gifts were piled high in the Pavilion at the University Farm on Wednesday evening, December 6. Twenty members of the staff at California State University Chico gathered to sort the gifts to be delivered to 86 families in the Chico area.

Debbie Sandoz, chair of the Staff Council’s Service Project Committee, estimated that gifts and money totaling over $40,000 were donated this year. Each family will receive a certificate for food of $50, along with gifts for each child in the family.

The Needy Children program at the university started in the 1980s. Staff Council adopted it as a project in 1990, and since 1994, Yvonne Lydon, Financial Aid, has chaired or co-chaired the program.

Social workers for the families share stories of the joy created in the family by the gifts. They say that there are many children and families that never forget the time they were adopted by CSU, Chico at Christmas time.

Sandoz said that the offices that participate really benefit from the program, too. “Pulling together your resources as an office at this time of year brings office employees closer together. It gets you in the spirit for the season and reminds you what the true meaning of Christmas is.”

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University Bans Fraternity Following Student’s Alcohol-Related Death

Tuesday, December 5th, 2000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 5, 2000

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

University Bans Fraternity Following Student’s Alcohol-Related Death

Based on its investigation and those of the Chico Police Department and the Butte County District Attorney’s Office, California State University, Chico has permanently withdrawn recognition from the Chico chapter of Pi Kappa Phi fraternity.

This action establishes that the fraternity will not use university facilities, participate in events or conduct business on the campus.

The university suspended the fraternity Oct. 10 until it could complete an investigation into the death of freshman Adrian Heideman, which took place at the Pi Kappa Phi house Oct. 7.

The university found that the fraternity violated provisions of CSU, Chico’s Student Organization Policy. Specifically, the university’s investigation found that the fraternity:
violated state laws regarding furnishing alcohol to minors;
violated its fraternity constitution, bylaws and rules regarding alcohol service and service to minors;
engaged in high-risk activities where the safety of students was at risk, and during which Adrian Heideman died; and
engaged in activities that caused, or were likely to cause, bodily danger or physical harm to students enrolled at CSU, Chico.

As part of the grievance and review procedure of the Student Organization Policy, the fraternity received a written statement Nov. 17 of the results of the university’s investigation. The fraternity was given a 10-day deadline to respond to the facts of the investigation, and it chose not to do so.

The university’s Student Activities Office is responsible for enforcing sanctions against student organizations. The withdrawal of recognition can be appealed by Pi Kappa Phi to the vice president for university advancement and student affairs.

“The Pi Kappa Phi chapter must be punished for its actions related to Adrian Heideman’s death,” said CSU, Chico President Manuel Esteban. “At the same time, I feel this by no means solves the problem of alcohol abuse at Chico. Our ongoing programs including peer counseling and drug and alcohol abuse education will be expanded. New initiatives will be taken, such as making fraternity pledging safer. We will work closely with students, faculty and staff and the Chico community to make changes and create a healthier campus.”

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Debate Team Making Its Mark Nationally

Monday, December 4th, 2000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 4, 2000

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260

Debate Team Making Its Mark Nationally

The California State University, Chico Debate program is establishing itself as one of the most competitive in the nation. The National Debate Tournament Association recently released its rankings, listing Chico as 12th in the nation.

The team scored a big win over #1 ranked Catholic University at the November 17-20 Wake Forest University Tournament in North Carolina. The team of James Hebert and Jeremy Bowers scored wins over both the Harvard team and the Catholic University team at the prestigious tournament. The wins will likely improve Chico’s ranking.

All teams with aspirations of winning the national tournament (held in March) attend the Wake Forest Tournament, the largest tournament of the year.

Closer to home, the team of Cyndy Rupp and Michelle Choat won the November 19 Butte Roadrunner Invitational with an undefeated record. Paul Freeman and Rebecca Anderson each won individual outstanding speaker awards.

Kristina Schriver, adviser to the Debate Team, said, “Since it is expensive to attend, we send our championship level teams to large national tournaments and send less experienced teams to regional tournaments.”

Smaller tournaments, such as the invitational, also count toward national rankings as long as they are sanctioned by the national organizations. Over 100 universities are part of the National Debate Tournament’s rankings.

The Debate team will take a short break for the holidays and will resume travel in January to Kansas City, where they will compete in tournaments at William Jewell College and the University of Missouri, Kansas City.

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Model UN Students Excel at Regional Conference

Friday, December 1st, 2000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 1, 2000

Kathleen McPartland
530-898-4260

Model UN Students Excel at Regional Conference

Sixteen first-year Model UN students from California State University, Chico came away with a total of fourteen awards from a conference held November 17-21 in Las Vegas.

Chico won more awards than any other university at the American West Model United Nations Conference. Teams from more than 20 universities, some traveling from as far away as Canada, participated.

Model UN activities include speaking on behalf of the issues of an assigned country, writing position papers, debating positions in committees, and lobbying other delegations. The preparation is extensive and includes research and public speaking practice.

To learn about Model UN and prepare to compete, students take Professor Rick Ostrom’s political science class on Model UN. Ostrom was assisted by Richard Elsom, former Associated Students president, who has had 10 years of Model UN experience and acted as co-head of the delegation.

“Richard and co-head delegate Erin Hofteig put the students through rigorous paces,” said Ostrom. “He took them to the amphitheatre at the creek and had them give extemporaneous speeches projecting across the sounds of the creek.”

“The experience was transformational for the students’ academic self-confidence,” said Ostrom. “The students learned that with preparation and hard work, they are competitive with the best students anywhere. I watched as they became more tolerant of other countries the more they learned.”

Ostrom attended “Symposium 2000″ meetings with other advisers and officers of the United Nations Association. He presented a paper about creating and sustaining a Model UN program. The paper addressed some of the challenges of funding a program that necessarily involves travel expenses.

“The Chico delegation is going to be fund-raising vigorously to pay for a trip to the National Model UN conference in New York in April 2001,” said Ostrom. “We’d like to be able to take seven returnees who brought us the top award at last yearÕs conference.”

The New York conference is the most competitive conference in the world. Several foreign countries also send student delegations to the conference. Chico’s 2000 delegation won both “Outstanding Delegation” and “Outstanding Position Papers” awards in New York.

The results of the hard work were realized in the following awards:

Distinguished Delegate Awards:
Sinan Al-Faqeeh
Ryan Crogan
Dalal Dweid
Meghan Eagleson

Outstanding Delegate Award:
Andreas Efstathiou

Distinguished Delegation Award:
Dalal Dweik and
Amanda Tripp for
representing Palestine

Distinguished Delegation Award:
Ryan Crogan
Megan Mahoney
Bob Ray and
Nathan Stankowski
for representing China

Special Thanks Award:
Amanda Tripp, Palestine

Special Thanks Award:
Sean Coleman, Israel

Special Thanks Award:
Carly Lucas for serving as General Assembly Rapporteur

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Museum of Anthropology to Present Drumming Exhibition

Tuesday, November 28th, 2000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 28, 2000

Ann Walker
530-898-4260

Museum of Anthropology to Present Drumming Exhibition

California State University, Chico’s Museum of Anthropology will open its “Drumming in the New Millennium: Building Bridges Across Cultures” exhibition on Tuesday, Dec. 5.

The museum, located on the 3rd floor of Langdon Hall on Warner and First Streets, offers exhibits free to the public Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Drumming in the New Millennium will be on display until May 5, 2001.

Drums from Africa, Egypt, India, North America, Mexico, Papua New Guinea and the Pacific Rim will be displayed. Some of the drums are on loan from the San Diego Museum of Man and some are from the universityÕs private collection.

CSU, Chico graduate student Patricia Leslie is currently working on a year-long program of cultural enrichment events to supplement the exhibition. The program will begin in the spring and feature lectures and demonstrations from those cultures represented in the exhibit.

On March 10, 2001, Tim Witter of the Ali Akbar College of Music in San Rafael will give a demonstration of the North Indian tabla. The tabla is a combination of one wood and one metal drum, which is often played in union with a melodic instrument such as the sitar. It will be played by Tim White, also from Ali Akbar College.

Other possible demonstrations include harvest ceremony drumming by Huichol Indian shamans, Hawaiian percussion as used in the ancient hula, West African, modern jazz and rock drumming as well as workshops for kids to learn how to make and play drums.

“It’s an opportunity for students to come and learn about other cultures and to promote tolerance and understanding of cultural differences,” said anthropology professor Stacy Schaefer, director of the Museum of Anthropology. “What more fun way to learn about cultures than through art and music?”

Aly Wood, museum curator, is currently working on a K-12 program called “Museum in a Box” designed to educate students who may not be able to travel to the exhibit. The traveling exhibit will bring authentic handmade drums as well as suggestions for lesson plans and related children’s books to Northern California classrooms.

This exhibition is part of the Building Bridges program, a year-long series of events designed to increase tolerance and respect on campus and within the Chico community.

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“Freedom Writers Diary” Author Back by Popular Demand

Friday, November 17th, 2000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 17, 2000

Amy Bryan
530-898-4260
Charles Zartman
Center of Bilingual/Multicultural Education
530-898-4026

“Freedom Writers Diary” Author Back by Popular Demand

Erin Gruwell, the teacher associated with “The Freedom Writers Diary,” will share her inspirational story at California State University, Chico on Monday, November 27, from 2:15 to 4:00 p.m. in PAC 135.

“The Freedom Writers Diary” is a collection of journals that Gruwell and her students wrote. The book tells the tale of a young teacher and the at-risk students she had reached.

Gruwell began her teaching career at Long Beach Wilson High School in fall1994. In her position, she was assigned multiple sections of Freshman English, a total of 150 students. Her colleagues had dubbed these students “unteachable and at-risk.”

Gruwell made school interesting for her students. She threw out the meticulously planned lessons and brought subjects to life using new books, guest speakers and field trips.

Through a variety of circumstances, Gruwell taught this same group of students English all four years. Except for one student who died, all of these students now attend college.

The talk is free and open to the public. For more information, call the Center of Bilingual/Multicultural Education at 898-4026.

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CSU, Chico to Demonstrate Mechanical Olive Harvester

Wednesday, November 15th, 2000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 15, 2000

Ann Walker
530-898-4143

CSU, Chico to Demonstrate Mechanical Olive Harvester

A faculty and student research team from California State University, Chico’s College of Agriculture and College of Engineering will demonstrate its redesigned mechanical olive harvester on Thursday, Nov. 16 at 10:30 a.m. at Olives Incorporated, an olive orchard near Corning.

Currently American olives are picked by hand, a labor intensive and expensive process. The use of a mechanical olive harvester could improve California’s position in the global market and have a major impact on the industry.

The $280,000-research project began last year when local olive grower and industry leader Bell Carter submitted a mechanized Italian-made “Olipicker” to the university for improvement.

“This machine was not designed for efficiency,” said Lynelle Bosworth, an agriculture business student who worked on the project. “The research team faced many challenges, including operator fatigue due to repeated use of multiple controls and vibration of the machine, lack of ergonomics, bruising of fruit during harvest and use of metric fittings that are not available in the United States.”

The research team redesigned the control systems of the “Olipicker” from a hydraulic valve to electronic joystick operation. The “new” machine reduced vibration during harvest and increased operator efficiency by reducing fatigue and repositioning the operator for better visibility of fruit on the trees.

The research team will be conducting statistical efficiency tests of the harvester to judge the critical factors involved in mechanical fruit removal. The tests will evaluate the economics of mechanical harvesting, fruit removal efficiency, fruit quality, harvest speed and tree damage by the machine.

The research project is directed by Lal Singh, professor of agriculture business. Joel Arthur, professor of civil engineering, Ramesh Varahmurti, professor of mechanical engineering, and Ron Borge, professor of agricultural engineering technology, are co-principal investigators. In addition, Charles Husome, mechanical engineering student, and Lynelle Bosworth are involved in all aspects of this research.

For more information and directions to the demonstration, contact Lynelle Bosworth at 530-899-7163.

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