Archive for the ‘1999 Spring’ Category

Engineering Students Place 2nd at National Bridge Competition

Wednesday, June 9th, 1999

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 9, 1999

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Engineering Students Place 2nd at National Bridge Competition

California State University, Chico’s team of student civil engineers fell just short of the top prize at the American Institute of Steel Construction’s National Bridge Competition, finishing second overall. The competition was held May 27-28 at the University of Alaska-Anchorage.

CSU, Chico had won the Mid-Pacific Regional Competition at UC Berkeley April 10. It was the third straight year CSU, Chico had won the regional contest in bridge building.

West Coast universities dominated the national competition for the first time in the eight-year history of the event. In a very tight finish, University of Nevada-Reno won the event, followed by CSU, Chico. Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo came in third.

Twenty regional steel-bridge building competitions attracting 186 university entries were conducted across the United States and Canada in 1999. Teams qualified for the national event by placing first or second at one of the regional contests.

Forty universities convened on the Anchorage campus for the competition. The national entry list read as a “who’s who” of well-known engineering schools, including Penn State, Ohio State, University of Illinois, Texas A & M, Clemson and Washington State.

The competition consists of four categories of evaluation: construction speed, stiffness, efficiency, and economy, which are calculated from measurements of assembly time, bridge weight and bridge deflection under loading. The sum of the placings in each category determines a school’s final ranking, with the university having the lowest sum declared the winner. To win, a bridge must be fast, light and stiff, while still having adequate strength.

The contest provides an excellent test of student performance in a multi-faceted, comprehensive team project. All aspects of structural engineering are represented in the contest, including computer-aided design, materials, fabrication, construction, functionality and economics.

The bridges, fabricated from structural steel, are approximately 18 feet long, 4 feet wide, and typically weigh less than 80 pounds. Disassembled, the bridges must consist of pieces no larger than 5 1/2 feet in length and 7 1/2 inches by 7 1/2 inches in cross-section.

The major features of the competition are an on-site, timed assembly and load testing of each bridge. Teams may consist of any number of students, and this year teams ranged from two to five students. Since bridge assembly time is multiplied by the number of students to determine “construction speed,” a smaller team with a rapid assembly technique is optimal.

During assembly, students must carry structural members from the staging areas, through an obstacle course modeled after a congested construction zone, to the assembly abutments. Since the team members represent construction cranes, a single student may carry only one piece of the bridge at a time, while two students may carry an assembly of up to three pieces. Bridges typically consist of 25 or more individual pieces. The bridges are constructed over a 9-foot-wide simulated river, and teams are penalized if they step in the “water.” A competitive team will assemble their bridge in less than three minutes.

After assembly, the bridges must safely support an applied load of 2,500 pounds and deflect no more than 2 inches. The best bridges deflect less than 0.2 inches under loading, while many bridges collapse during the loading portion of the contest.

CSU, Chico and Nevada-Reno were closely rated by judges at the regional as well as the national competition. Nevada-Reno’s bridge was lighter than CSU, Chico’s, but Chico’s was stiffer and faster to erect. Chico won the two categories based on stiffness and speed, while Reno won the two classifications involving weight. The judges broke the tie based on aesthetics and contructability, also a close call, with the nod going to Chico.

At the national event, the bridges from the two universities were the top entries and again evenly matched. Both teams had modified their bridges since the regional match-up in an attempt to gain the upper hand, yet the two teams were virtually tied heading into the final phase of the competition. As an indication of the closeness of the competition between these two schools, the Chico team’s bridge came within 0.027 inches, about 1/32nd of an inch, during the bridge deflection phase of winning the event for CSU, Chico.

Members of the Chico team are civil engineering majors Jason Zwinggi, Jarrod Holliday and Josh Wallace. Faculty advisers are Russell Mills and Joel Arthur. Components of the Chico State bridge were fabricated by engineering technicians Jim Luallen and Mike Renwick, and logistic support was provided by the department├Ľs administrative coordinator, Dagmar Hampton.

CSU, Chico first participated in the competition four years ago, qualifying for the national event in only its second year of participation.

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Chico Professor Leads Campaign to End Humiliating P.E. Practices

Tuesday, May 25th, 1999

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 25, 1999

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Chico Professor Leads Campaign to End Humiliating P.E. Practices

In a speech following the Columbine High tragedy, President Clinton asked citizens to seek to understand how youths become alienated from their peers, and related how he had felt as a boy when he wasn’t picked to play in a schoolyard game.

California State University, Chico physical education professor Cathrine Himberg knows all too well what happened to the president, because it happens to thousands of school-age youngsters every week. Thanks to a discussion about dodge ball, and some inspiration from her 10-year-old son and a friend, she has started a campaign to wipe out such practices.

Himberg has launched CASPER, which stands for Concerned Adults and Students for Physical Education Reform. The organization seeks to end P.E. class practices that alienate and humiliate many children, including using exercise as punishment, asking “captains” to pick teams, teaching participant elimination games and having classes watch students take fitness tests “in the spotlight.”

CASPER’s Web page, www.csuchico.edu/phed/Casper, has examples of other inappropriate P.E. practices, and ways for teachers, parents and students to encourage schools to end them.

“As a former P.E. teacher, I’d been aware of inappropriate practices, but it wasn’t until I was a parent that I saw so clearly the damage being done,” said Himberg. “Now when I see kids humiliated by being picked last or not picked at all, it crushes my heart.”

As one letter written and posted to the CASPER home page points out, P.E. class anguish is long-standing: “I was always the last one picked. It had been that way since elementary school and would go on that way into college. Even if someone was injured but could still play, that person would still be picked before I would be… Many times I started to believe I was a weakling and a failure that no one wanted.”

Along with the psychological damage, Himberg said, children excluded or humiliated in P.E. class also often become physically inactive young adults, contributing to an increasingly sedentary population. “When you aren’t involved, it leads you away from staying active,” she said.

In many cases, no one in the school knows the right way to run a P.E. class, Himberg said. Budget cuts have eliminated P.E. teachers from many schools, so that classroom teachers with little or no P.E. training are responsible for physical education. The result is “organized recess,” Himberg said.

“Would you ever expect a teacher in reading to give two books to the class, and expect all the students to take part and learn? Some P.E. classes are like that. Students spend more time waiting for a turn than they do actively involved and learning,” Himberg said. “Parents need to know there are plenty of options for how to have healthy, developmentally appropriate classes.”

Since CASPER debuted, the response has been “overwhelmingly positive,” Himberg said. Last month, she passed out 750 CASPER buttons at the national meeting of P.E. teachers and teacher educators, and found many of the field’s leaders wearing them throughout the conference. “The general feeling is, it’s about time somebody was doing something about this,” she said.

Himberg said when she returned from the national conference, the editor of the journal Teaching Elementary Physical Education had already written her to ask if she would write a series of articles on inappropriate P.E. practices. The first is scheduled to appear in August.

Himberg is also currently writing Teaching Secondary Physical Education in the Information Technology Age, which is scheduled to be published in fall 2000. Co-authors are Himberg’s husband, CSU, Chico communication design professor John Roussell, and CSU, Chico physical education professor Gayle Hutchinson.

To spread the word about CASPER, Himberg is writing grants, forming an advisory board, planning a brochure to send to PTAs and seeking sponsors for the nonprofit organization. Rollerblade of Northern California helped underwrite the building of the Web page.

The origin of CASPER dates to last spring, when Himberg sat in on a session at the 1998 national conference discussing dodge ball. The popular P.E. class game is notorious for favoring strong-armed youngsters and humiliating others. “That got me thinking,” Himberg said, and she went home and talked about P.E. with her son and a neighborhood friend. “The boys and I came up with the CASPER name and slogan that night,” she said.

Himberg admits she did not face P.E. alienation growing up in her native Norway, but became familiar with it after she moved to the U.S. and later began her studies in physical education. While completing her Ph.D. at Virginia Tech, she taught P.E. in an elementary school in Blacksburg, Va. She now teaches and trains future P.E. teachers at CSU, Chico.

Himberg said she had not heard Clinton mention his personal P.E. tale but did hear others in the wake of the Littleton tragedy. “People are trying to make sense of these tragic shootings,” she said. “Sadly, CASPER’s message is timely.”

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Opera Group to Perform on China Tour

Friday, May 14th, 1999

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 14, 1999

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Opera Group to Perform on China Tour

Music students and faculty from California State University, Chico will celebrate the Opera Workshop’s 40th anniversary by traveling to China next fall to perform at China’s most prestigious conservatories.

Ying Yeh, director of the Opera Workshop and one of China’s best-known opera singers, will lead a group of about 20 music students to China Nov. 18-25. Music department chair James Bankhead will also be part of the contingent, along with other faculty, parents and alumni.

Yeh and the students will perform at China’s top music conservatories in Beijing and Shanghai, as well the Beijing Language and Culture University and the music conservatory in the city of Xi’an, the historic former capital of China.

While visiting the three Chinese cities, the group will take time to see the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, Tian’anmen Square, the Terra-Cotta Warriors and other landmarks.

In addition, the group will rendezvous with English professor Frank Li and 15 CSU, Chico students who will be spending the fall semester at the Beijing Language and Culture University. This is the first year of CSU, Chico’s Beijing Semester program.

Yeh said a television station in Beijing is planning to do a news feature about the visit of CSU, Chico students and faculty.

“I don’t think we have ever led a student group like this to China before,” said Yeh. “It is a tremendous opportunity for them to explore a different culture and share our music.”

The students are planning to perform standard opera pieces, American pieces and some Chinese music.

The China trip is open to all CSU, Chico faculty staff, students and alumni. The cost will be $1,595, which includes transportation, lodging and meals for the eight-day trip. For more information about the trip, call 530-898-4082.

Yeh said people in China are embracing classical music more and more. Last year, Puccini’s “Turandot” was produced in China’s Forbidden City, and it was extremely popular, she said.

Yeh, the first opera singer permitted to leave China and perform internationally after the Cultural Revolution, was videotaped earlier this year by a visiting Chinese television crew for a special Chinese New Year broadcast Feb. 16.

The two-and-one-half hour Chinese New Year broadcast, produced and aired by Chinese Central TV, was one of the most-watched programs in China, which has a population of 1.2 billion people.

CSU, Chico’s Opera Workshop, founded in 1959, offers young singers the opportunity to work closely with music faculty and perform a wide range of opera and operetta music. Recent productions have included Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro,” Puccini’s “La Boheme” and the spring 1999 production of Verdi’s “La Traviata.”

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Telcordia Technologies, Inc. and California State University, Chico Offer Telecommunications Master Of Science Telcordia and CSU Address Demand for Skilled Telecom Engineers Through Training

Tuesday, May 11th, 1999

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 11, 1999

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Telcordia Technologies, Inc. and California State University, Chico Offer Telecommunications Master Of Science
Telcordia and CSU Address Demand for Skilled Telecom Engineers Through Training

Telcordia Technologies Inc. (formerly Bellcore), the world’s leader in advanced telecommunications training and education, and California State University├Ľs (CSU) Chico Education Network (CEN), one of the most successful university-based educational networks in the nation, today announce the availability of a Master of Science telecommunications degree for technical professionals.

The Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies: Telecommunications offers individual career enhancement, as well as a tool for companies to develop skilled telecom professionals. The program is a collaborative effort to be delivered at customer sites via live satellite and Internet instruction through CEN, hands-on training at Telcordia training sites, and Telcordia seminars that promote a working understanding of the emerging technologies and their business applications in the telecommunications industry.

“Training solves the critical need in the telecom industry for the on-going enhancement of employee skills and knowledge,” according to Pat Cataldo, Group Vice President – Telcordia Learning Services. “Telcordia helps the industry prepare telecom professionals for their job responsibilities and maintain a highly productive workforce that keeps pace with the rapid changes and convergence of technologies. Telcordia’s relationship with CSU, Chico combines the best of telecommunications industry training with leading academic programs in distance education, resulting in unique learning opportunities that address customer needs.”

The 2 1/2-year degree program is offered through CSU, Chico and is divided into four basic components:

* Five CSU, Chico core telecommunications courses broadcast live from the Chico campus via the Chico Education Network to the student’s work site.

* Four hands-on technical courses presented at the Telcordia Training and Education Center in Lisle, Ill., utilizing Telcordia’s multi-vendor training labs replicating real world network environments.

* Six selections from a series of 13 elective Telcordia seminars offered on a regular basis throughout the United States, or at the student’s site.

* A customized master’s degree project under the supervision and assistance of the CSU, Chico telecommunications graduate advisor.

“For the first time, people will be able to earn a university degree by combining live, satellite and Internet-delivered telecommunications classes from CSU, Chico with credit-bearing Telcordia labs and seminars. In addition to the telecommunications degree programming, network partners will also have access to two additional degree programs in computer science,” remarked Ralph Meuter, Dean of CSU, Chico Continuing Education. “By working with Telcordia, our university is offering students access to the best minds and laboratories in the industry,” added Terry Curtis, Professor of Communication Design, Program Coordinator, and internationally recognized telecom educator.

Telcordia Technologies is the world’s largest provider of telecommunications training. Telcordia provides instruction to more than 30,000 individuals annually, and has trained more than 700,000 persons from seven continents since its founding. To learn more about Telcordia Learning Services programs, call 1-800-TEACH ME or visit the Web site.

Telcordia Technologies Inc., formerly Bellcore, is an SAIC company providing software, engineering, consulting, and training services to optimize the performance of communications networks worldwide. Telcordia was created in 1984, employs 6,000 professionals, and has revenues of more than $1.2 billion. Telcordia is headquartered in Morristown, New Jersey, with offices throughout the United States, Europe, Central and South America, and Asia Pacific.

CSU, Chico, established in 1887, is a fully accredited university ranked among the top public institutions in the nation. Recognized as a leader in distance education, CSU, Chico established the Chico Education Network in 1984. It is one of the most successful university-based satellite networks in the nation. Corporate participation is required for enrollment in the Chico Education Network, and allows access to other professional degree programs offered through the California State University system. To become a member of the network, call the Center for Regional and Continuing Education at 530-898-6105. For information about master’s program admission requirements and CEN enrollment procedures, call the CSU, Chico Center for Regional and Continuing Education at 530-898-6105, or visit the Web site at http://rce.csuchico.edu/cen/mstelecom.

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Chico Students Excel in State and National Exams

Monday, May 10th, 1999

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 10, 1999

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Chico Students Excel in State and National Exams

California State University, Chico students continue to score exceptionally well on national and statewide professional competency exams, as evidenced by CSU, Chico’s recent top ranking among schools with students taking the California Reading Instruction Competency Assessment test.

Passage rates for the test, released in April by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, revealed that CSU, Chico led all public and private universities with a 98.4 pass rate. The test is a mandated in California for applicants for a Multiple Subject Credential.

Other universities with prospective teachers taking the test included Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, 97.6 pass rate, Long Beach State, 84.3, San Diego State, 83.3, and Sonoma State, 89.1.

In another academic area, CSU, Chico students taking the national speech pathology certification exam earlier this year had a 100 percent passing rate. National test results released last year by the Educational Testing Service showed that CSU, Chico graduate students in speech pathology performed better over the previous two years than students from the largest and most prestigious U.S. universities. Chico students’ pass rate on the exam over that period-92 percent-was five percent higher than the pass rate of schools classified as Research University I and II.

Many students are required to take exams when completing bachelor or master’s programs in order to begin professional careers and become licensed or certified. Other examples of recent student achievements include the following:

* School of Nursing took top ranking among 217 U.S. nursing schools with B.A. programs when its 1997-98 graduates had a 100-percent passage rate on the national RN licensing exam, while the national average was 86 percent.

* Nutrition and food sciences students have had a 95 percent pass rate on the Registered Dietitians national exam for the past 10 years. In addition, students completing the Dietetic Internship, which is available for only M.S. students, have had a 100 percent entrance exam passage rate. The national average passage rate is around 80 percent..

* College of Business students taking the 1998 Certified Financial Planner Board Certification exams had a passage rate of 75 percent, while the national average is only 57 percent.

* Engineering seniors are encouraged to take the national Engineer-In-Training (EIT) exam and the Professional Engineers License Exam to become licensed as professional engineers by the California State Board of Registration. The overall average pass rate for the last four years for CSU, Chico students is 83 percent, compared to 62.25 percent for all students taking the EIT.

In explaining the high marks CSU, Chico students receive, administrators point to a campus climate of hard work that expects student success.

“Students come to Chico and find a university environment that is caring and demanding at the same time,” said Robert Hannigan, vice provost for enrollment management. “Our students get focused on the tasks ahead, which is why our graduation rate leads the CSU, and why we lead many other schools in national competitions.”

“These national exams are objective and competitive. We do well in them because we demand hard work on the part of our students,” said CSU, Chico President Manuel Esteban. “I am very proud of the accomplishments of our students and feel that their success reflects well on the commitment and excellence of our faculty.”

CSU, Chico Provost Scott McNall said, “Our students do well because of the incredible dedication of our faculty to the students and the willingness of the faculty to work hard to create positive learning environments and to help students realize their dreams.”

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New College of Business Dean Named

Friday, May 7th, 1999

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 7, 1999

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

New College of Business Dean Named

Heikki Rinne, chair of the consumer sciences and retailing department at Purdue University, has been named the new dean of California State University, Chico’s College of Business.

Rinne replaces management professor Marc Siegall, who has been interim dean since August 1998. Rinne will assume his new post at the start of the fall 1999 semester.

We are very fortunate to have someone of Dr. Rinne’s caliber coming to our university. He is an outstanding scholar and administrator,” said Provost Scott McNall. “I also want to thank Marc Siegall for the fine job he has done and for the leadership he has demonstrated and continues to demonstrate on a daily basis.”

Rinne has headed the 32-member consumer sciences and retailing department at Purdue since 1997. Prior to that, he was chair of the business management department at Brigham Young University, where he was a professor from 1984 to 1994.

From 1995 to 1997, Rinne was president and CEO of Halton Systems, a division of Halton Group, an international marketing and manufacturing company. From 1994 to 1995, he was senior vice president of marketing for FLP International, a marketing and manufacturing company for health products.

Rinne is the author of a popular book and many articles on retailing and marketing.

Rinne received his Ph.D. in marketing from Purdue in 1981. He earned a bachelor of science degree from Brigham Young in 1975 and an MBA from University of Oregon in 1976.

I see strong areas of growth for the college ahead, and a significant opportunity for the college to make an impact on business,” said Rinne. “The college has great potential to serve students and has been known for that. I’d like to contribute to that,” he said.

Rinne is a U.S. citizen and native of Finland. He and his wife, Vicki, have five children.

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Chemistry Students Share $25,000 Grant

Tuesday, April 27th, 1999

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 27, 1999

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Chemistry Students Share $25,000 Grant

California State University, Chico’s chemistry department announced it has chosen five students to be awarded $2,500 each as a part of a $25,000 grant from Roche Bioscience that encourages students’ interest in organic chemistry.

Recipients Lisa Hegewisch, Lindsay Jacks, Lori LaRiviera, Dana Ray and Marty Wallace will be participating in research programs during the summer of 1999. The students will work on a synthesis of novel organic molecules of interest to the pharmaceutical industry.

Lindsay Jacks and Dana Ray will be working with chemistry professor Donald Alger on the synthesis of a series of molecules that may have potential use as fungistats to inhibit the growth of molds in breads and cereals.

Lisa Hegewisch, Lori La Riviera and Marty Wallace will accompany chemistry professor David Ball to UC, Santa Barbara this summer, where they will be allowed to participate in a variety of on-going projects at the university’s chemistry laboratories.

Roche Bioscience is the Palo Alto-based division of the international pharmaceutical company F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. Part of Roche’s motivation for awarding the funds was CSU, Chico’s track record of sending students to graduate school and then to work in the laboratories of prominent researchers at pharmaceutical companies.

A luncheon in honor of the awardees and Dr. Deborah Reuter from Roche Bioscience, who arranged the donation, will be held Friday, April 30, on the Julia Morgan House lawn.

For more information, contact chemistry department secretary Barbara Paquin at 530-898-5259.

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Teacher Training Program Lauded By State Association

Thursday, April 15th, 1999

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 15, 1999

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Teacher Training Program Lauded By State Association

California State University, Chico’s Tri-Placement Program, which offers students an intensive apprenticeship in teacher training, has won a prestigious award from the California Council on the Education of Teachers.

The program received the Quality of Education Award for Distinguished Service to Children and the Training of Teachers at the council’s spring conference in San Jose March 19.

Assistant Professor Nancy Williams and Margaret Mow, distinguished teacher in residence, were present at the conference to receive the award. Both are in the professional studies in education department of the College of Communication and Education.

Each year, the council chooses programs to honor in keeping with its conference theme. This year’s theme was “Challenges and Opportunities in School/University Partnerships.”

CSU, Chico’s Tri-Placement Program requires prospective teachers to work in at least three different classrooms four and a half days a week for one school year. The program collaborates with more than 80 teachers in eight schools in the Chico Unified School District and Durham Unified School District.

Along with apprenticing with cooperating teachers for a full year, Tri-Placement students take special courses preparing them for their extended practice teaching and work closely with CSU, Chico faculty during their time teaching in local schools. Approximately 20-25 students annually take part in the program.

Professor Williams, who has been working with the program since 1982, said roughly one-third of the cooperating teachers in the Chico and Durham districts are graduates of the program.

Tri-Placement was started at CSU, Chico 20 years ago. The program also won the distinguished service award from the council 10 years ago.

The California Council on the Education of Teachers, established in 1945, has a membership of teachers, teacher educators and administrators interested in a statewide dialogue on education. The council holds conferences annually in Southern and Northern California and publishes the journal Teacher Education Quarterly.

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Students Win Engineering Contest Building Space Rock Retriever

Tuesday, April 6th, 1999

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 6, 1999

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Students Win Engineering Contest Building Space Rock Retriever

Two California State University, Chico students won the American Society of Mechanical Engineer’s 1999 Regional Student Design Competition in San Jose March 26-28 with a rock-retrieving extraterrestrial vehicle.

Two other teams from CSU, Chico also finished in the top five among the 18 teams participating. UC Santa Barbara, Santa Clara University and San Jose State were among the other schools represented in the competition.

The winning CSU, Chico students, seniors Kevin Looney and Michael Walker, qualify for the national design competition in Nashville in January.

The teams were required to design and build a radio-controlled vehicle similar to “Sojourner,” which NASA used to test rocks on Mars. The student-built vehicles had to retrieve a rock, avoid a maze of barriers and deposit the rock in a target area. The vehicles were graded according to weight, speed and accuracy.

Two years ago, CSU, Chico hosted the Regional Student Conference of the ASME, and one of its student teams came in first in that competition as well. Looney and then-senior Mike Davis teamed up and won with their machine that moved two ping pong balls and a golf ball from a starting point into a box.

Students typically work half a year on a project for the design competition. Looney and Walker built their rock-retrieval vehicle as their required senior project.

The other CSU, Chico student teams in the design competition were Nathan Drury and Pete Andreotti, who came in fourth, and Scott Norris and Phil Headley, who placed fifth.

Drury also came in third in the ASME’s Poster Competition. His poster title was “Telerobotics.”

The winning rock-retrieval vehicle will be demonstrated by its student builders at 9 a.m. Thursday, April 8, Langdon Engineering Center, Room 122.

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Campus Community Clean-Up Planned

Tuesday, March 30th, 1999

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 30, 1999

Joe Wills
530-898-4143

Campus Community Clean-Up Planned

California State University, Chico will be holding “Scour and Devour,” a campus community clean-up followed by a barbecue, on Saturday, April 17.

Teams of students will assemble on the Kendall Hall lawn, rain or shine, at 9 a.m. and work on clean-up projects on campus, along the railroad tracks adjoining campus and in the neighborhoods south and north of campus.

Projects will include picking up litter, painting buildings and removing graffiti. Clean-up groups will be assigned to specific jobs on and off campus. Many representatives of campus and community organizations will be participating.

Following the event will be a barbecue for participants on the Kendall Hall lawn, beginning around 12:30 p.m. All the food and beverages will be provided.

For further information, contact Linda Troyer at 530-898-6131.

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